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Forbes

Katie Rae, CEO and managing partner of The Engine, speaks with Forbes reporter David Jeans about the second round of funding raised by The Engine and how the venture is looking to help support tough tech ideas. “These are things with often longer [investment] timeframes,” Rae says. “They’ve almost always been backed by government-led research, and now they are ready to translate into companies.”

The Kelly Clarkson Show

Danielle Geathers, president of the MIT Undergraduate Association, joins Kelly Clarkson to discuss her goals for her presidency. Geathers highlights the Talented Ten Mentorship program, which aims to help increase matriculation of Black women by pairing “Black women in high school with Black women at MIT.” Clarkson applauded her work, noting “that’s amazing mentorship…You can dream big when you see that someone has made it there.”

The Washington Post

In an article for The Washington Post, Prof. Scott Sheffield argues that “circuit breakers” – strict closures for limited periods of time - could be used to help reduce Covid-19 infections. Sheffield and his co-authors explain that circuit breakers could “interrupt viral spread and bring case counts down without the long-lasting social and economic pain of extended lockdowns.”

Next Avenue

In an article for Next Avenue that highlights scientists over age 65 who are making “enormous contributions to their fields of expertise,” Diane Estabrook features Prof. Sallie “Penny” Chisholm and her research investigating Prochlorococcus. “The earth operates on solar energy, so understanding Prochlorococcus’ design could help us design artificial photosynthetic machines,” says Chisholm.

WHDH 7

7 News spotlights how MIT researchers have developed a new wearable sensor that can be used to help people with ALS communicate. “The wearable technology, known as Comfortable Decoders, recognizes tiny facial movements that can help patients communicate simple statements, like ‘I’m hungry’ or ‘I love you.’”

CBS Boston

CBS Boston reporter Juli McDonald spotlights how NASA's ORISIS-Rex spacecraft carried a key imagine instrument, designed and built by students from MIT and Harvard, on its mission to sample the surface of the asteroid Bennu. Prof. Richard Binzel, co-investigator for the mission, explains that, the device was developed to “measure the asteroid in X-ray light, which is part of the process of figuring out what the asteroid is made out of.”

Cambridge Chronicle

In an article for the Cambridge Chronicle, Maya Johnson describes MIT’s efforts to mitigate Covid-19 transmission on campus. “Our main goal is to know where the virus is and make sure that we can prevent our community from getting the virus,” says Suzanne Blake, director of MIT Emergency Management. “Public health and safety is our number one priority for students.”

Forbes

Researchers from MIT Lincoln Laboratory have developed a new quantum chip with integrated photonics, a “vital step to advance the evolution of trapped-ion quantum computers and quantum sensors,” reports Paul Smith-Goodson for Forbes.

New York Times

New York Times reporter Steve Lohr highlights the technology startup Ultranauts, which was founded by two MIT graduates and follows a “distinctive set of policies and practices to promote diversity and inclusion among employees.”

IEEE Spectrum

IEEE Spectrum reporter Daniel Dern spotlights the work of alumna Merryl Gross, an information architect and senior UX designer for a company that develops web-based software that helps nurses and doctors manage the care of patients with dialysis and other conditions. Gross explains that user design is basically, “applying human psychology to the design of made objects.” 

Popular Mechanics

Graduate student David Berardo has demonstrated how science enthusiasts can measure the speed of light at home using a bar of chocolate and the microwave, reports Caroline Delbert for Popular Mechanics. After microwaving the chocolate for about 20 seconds, “what you’ll see is a specific pattern of melting that shows the wavelength of the microwaves that power your oven.”

Featured Videos

Five years in the making, MIT’s autonomous floating vessels get a size upgrade and learn a new way to communicate aboard the waters.

A new skin-like device can measure small movements such as a twitch or a smile, allowing ALS patients to communicate sentiments such as “I love you,” or “I’m hungry.”

A new electronic design tool lets users digitally model an object's form and electronic function in one integrated space.

Researchers at MIT and elsewhere have developed a solar-powered device that can extract drinkable water directly from the air even in dry regions.

In transitioning 10.213 (Chemical thermodynamics) to a self-paced mode last spring, ChemE professors Chris Love and Will Tisdale discovered ways to make remote learning work — and gained insights into their students. “They are just so genuinely interested in learning,” says Tisdale.

In a project that will run through the fall semester, wastewater from seven buildings on campus will be tested each day for SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes Covid-19. The project is designed to determine if wastewater testing can be an effective early warning system for outbreaks on campus.

Pat Pataranutaporn, a research assistant in the Fluid Interfaces group, discusses his work at the Media Lab and talks about adjusting to the new normal of the pandemic and other changes on MIT’s campus.

As students return for a semester with mostly remote learning, instructors in MIT’s Department of Mechanical Engineering introduce new innovative methods of teaching hands-on classes which may inform educational best practices for years to come.

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