Skip to content ↓

Top News

📬 Want a dose of MIT in your inbox? Subscribe to the MIT Daily and/or MIT Weekly newsletters.

Recent Highlights

More MIT News articles

In the Media

7 News

Students in Prof. Azra Akšamija’s class created Covid-19 masks that reflected their experiences and shared powerful messages with the world, reports 7 News. “Students learn how to articulate problems they see in the world and issues that we are facing,” says Akšamija. “And to communicate that and translate that through their designs.”

Planet Money

Greg Rosalsky of NPR’s Planet Money spotlights Prof. Daron Acemoglu’s research exploring how automation is driving inequality in America. Rosalsky notes that Acemoglu hopes his research “will get policymakers to take a new, smarter approach to technological change.”

The Boston Globe

President L. Rafael Reif has been named to the board of the Massachusetts Competitive Partnership, reports Jon Chesto for The Boston Globe. “Reif is expected to focus in particular on the Partnership’s “Growing the Innovation Economy” committee, whose goals include enhancing science, math, and computer education in public schools in Massachusetts,” writes Chesto.

Fast Company

Quinnton Harris ’11 speaks with Fast Company reporter Elizabeth Segran about the campaign to make Juneteenth a paid holiday. “There are so many times in my life that I haven’t felt American, whether that’s in the workplace or in white spaces,” Harris says. “When I learned that Juneteenth was a celebration of Black liberation, it felt so right.”

Financial Times

Profs. Esther Duflo and Abhijit Banerjee speak with Financial Times reporter Martin Sandbu about the need for better economic “plumbing,” the shortcomings of policy to address climate change and the state of the profession of economics. Duflo notes that before the pandemic there had been improvement in quality of life around the world, "in part because of more focus on these quality of life issues and, I would argue, a little bit more attention given to plumbing and setting pragmatic objectives and programs as opposed to aiming for some more elusive growth.”

Gizmodo

LIGO researchers have nearly frozen the motion of atoms across four mirrors used to detect ripples in space-time, reports Isaac Schultz for Gizmodo. “We could actually use the same capability of LIGO to do this other thing, which is to use LIGO to measure the random jiggling motion of these mirrors—use that information which we have about the motion—and apply a counteracting force, so that you know you would stop the atoms from moving,” says Prof. Vivishek Sudhir.

Forbes

Forbes contributor Eric Tegler spotlights how MIT researchers are developing a fiber with digital capabilities. “Individuals wearing garments with digital fibers could be alerted to vital information about their physiology and environmental exposures, and share health/injury and location data with support forces,” Tegler explains.

The Boston Globe

Ahead of Juneteenth, Malia Lazu, a Lecturer in the Technological Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Strategic Management Group at Sloan, speaks with Jeneé Osterheldt of The Boston Globe about what Black freedom looks like. “For myself, Black liberation can be defined as the self determination of Black people,” says Lazu. “Liberation is a culmination of honoring the past, being healthy in the present and curious about the future.”

Science Friday

Kate Darling, a research specialist at the Media Lab, speaks with Ira Flatow on Science Friday about “the historical lessons of our relationships with animals, and how they could inform our legal, ethical, and even emotional choices about robots and AI.”

The Indicator from Planet Money

Prof. Chris Knittel speaks with Stacey Vanek Smith on The Indicator from Planet Money podcast about the high price of oil and what that means for electric vehicles. “If everybody believed EVs were taking over next year, we would see oil prices tank now,” says Knittel. “The fact that they’re not tanking suggests that the markets think there’ll be sustained demand for oil for quite some time.”  

Medgadget

MIT researchers have developed a new stent based on kirigami, the Japanese art of cutting and folding paper. The stent “can provide localized drug delivery through needle-like projections that pop out when the stent is extended,” reports Conn Hastings for Medgadget.

Fast Company

Prof. John Fernández, Director of the MIT Environmental Solutions Initiative, partnered with Handel Architects on the design of a new Boston high-rise that will be the largest office building with Passive House-certification, an exacting sustainability standard. “This is exactly the kind of building that cities need to consider facilitating, because cities now have very aggressive carbon emissions reduction goals,” Fernández explains to Adele Peters of Fast Company.

Featured Videos

Ashely Kaiser, a graduating PhD student in the department of materials science and engineering, worked with MIT's necstlab and NASA to leverage carbon nanotubes in designing stronger, tougher, and lighter materials for future space vehicles and habitats.

For only the second time in its history, MIT celebrated its Commencement in an online ceremony. This year’s event featured a musical composition created specially for the event, titled Diary Of A Pandemic Year.

For those who haven’t experienced the glorious sights of spring at MIT, we share this glimpse of our campus in full bloom. The blossoms and greenery are accompanied by flutist Sara Simpson, a PhD student in BCS.

After 31 years engineering medical solutions for the National Institutes of Health (NIH), Seth Goldstein ’61, SM ’62, SM ’63, SCD ’66 launched a second career as a kinetic sculptor. Not only do they move, they all achieve a specific goal.

On National Nurses Day, MIT honors the 46 nurses who serve our community at MIT Medical. At times when people feel alone or vulnerable, “it is the nurse who can really make that connection, and make them feel comfortable,” Maureen Johnston says.

A team of MIT researchers have observed that when salty water evaporates from a heated, superhydrophobic surface the crystal structures that form can easily be removed or roll away on their own.

A team of engineers from MIT developed a navigational method for autonomous vehicles to navigate accurately in the Arctic Ocean without GPS.

More News