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Times Higher Ed

Times Higher Ed reporter Matthew Reisz memorializes the life and work of Prof. Angelika Amon, a “trailblazing” scientist known for her research into the life cycle of cells. “Angelika existed in a league of her own,” says Whitehead fellow Kristin Knouse. “She had the energy and excitement of someone who picked up a pipette for the first time, but the brilliance and wisdom of someone who had been doing it for decades.”

The Washington Post

Writing for The Washington Post, Vice President for Open Learning Sanjay Sarma and research associate Luke Yoquinto explore study habits and the science of learning, emphasizing the importance of spacing out learning, in lieu of cramming. “Introducing a bit of space into one’s study or practice schedule can improve long-term outcomes for just about anyone, at any age, trying to learn almost anything,” they write.

The Economist

MIT researchers have developed a new system that uses solar power to sterilize medical tools, according to The Economist. The system “should cost just a tenth as much to make commercially as a conventional autoclave of equivalent potency.”

HuffPost

Prof. Tavneet Suri speaks with HuffPost reporter Laura Paddison about her research exploring the effectiveness of the universal basic income (UBI). “We do think the UBI will provide some ‘insurance’ against bad events,” says Suri. “If something bad happens, you have a fallback.”

WBUR

Writing for WBUR, Prof. Kate Kellogg and alumna Noa Ghersin outline how to help prevent outbreaks of Covid-19 at long-term care facilities. “Nursing homes lack the resources of other institutions,” they write. “They aren’t states, they aren’t cities, they aren’t major hospital systems.”

The Boston Globe

Judge Dalila Argaez Wendlandt SM ’93 has been confirmed to the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court, reports Matt Stout for The Boston Globe. Gov. Charlie Baker noted that Wendlandt will bring “intellectual horsepower, kindness, and grace” to the court.

Axios

Axios reporter Bryan Walsh writes that during the virtual AI and the Work of the Future Congress, Elisabeth Reynolds, executive director of the MIT Task Force on the Work of the Future, noted that “education and training are central to helping the current and next generation thrive in the labor market.”

The Boston Globe

MIT researchers have discovered the molecular structure of a protein that plays a key role in the coronavirus’ ability to replicate itself and stimulate the host cell’s inflammation response, reports Travis Anderson for The Boston Globe. “If researchers can find a way to ‘block this channel,’” writes Anderson, “then they might be able to reduce the ‘pathogenicity of the virus’ and also obstruct viral replication.”

Newsday

Danielle Grey-Stewart speaks with Robert Brodsky of Newsday about receiving a Rhodes Scholarship. “It will allow me to study how environmental policy is formed from the context of how we look at society and nature,” says Grey-Stewart. “It’s really important that when finding engineering solutions, you can connect with communities… and uplift them as equal thought partners in finding solutions to pervasive problems.”

National Public Radio (NPR)

Prof. Martin Zwierlein speaks with Madeline Sofia and Emily Kwong of NPR’s Short Wave about his work with ultracold quantum gases and observing superfluid states of matter. “Luckily we have techniques to actually take rather beautiful pictures of this quantum soup of these whirlpools of individual atoms,” says Zwierlein, “to try and make it out of this invisible realm and make it very real, touchable.”

Fast Company

Fast Company reporter Adele Peters spotlights Particles for Humanity, an MIT spinoff that is developing a new technology that makes it possible to deliver multiple doses of a vaccine in one shot. “The new technology works like traditional drug delivery,” writes Peters, “but with the addition of tiny time-release capsules filled with antigens, the part of the vaccine that stimulates the immune system so that it can later respond to a virus.”

Featured Videos

A new MIT-developed system called RoboGrammar makes it possible to simulate and determine which robot design, out of thousands of possibilities, will work best based on what parts you have and what terrain it needs to traverse.

Osvy Rodriguez, a UROP in the Signal Kinetics group, recounts his journey to MIT and how he began working with group head Fadel Adib on a recent project.

A team of researchers from MIT and the Indian Institute of Technology has developed a device that could provide pressurized steam to run autoclaves without the need for electricity in off-grid areas such as the developing world.

A team led by Assistant Professor Giovanni Traverso, of the Department of Mechanical Engineering, developed a durable respirator with N95 filters that can be sterilized and reused.

Researchers at MIT’s Center for Bits and Atoms have created tiny building blocks that exhibit a variety of unique mechanical properties.

Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Professor Jacob White guides his students through the challenges of moving their lab-based class online.

Five years in the making, MIT’s autonomous floating vessels get a size upgrade and learn a new way to communicate aboard the waters.

Researchers at MIT and elsewhere have developed a solar-powered device that can extract drinkable water directly from the air even in dry regions.

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