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"Shark Tank" meets book publishing

The MIT Press will host a Pitchfest competition at this year's Boston Book Festival.
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Pitchfest will give six contestants the opportunity to present their best science or technology book idea before a panel of judges and a live audience at the Boston Book Festival in October.
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Pitchfest will give six contestants the opportunity to present their best science or technology book idea before a panel of judges and a live audience at the Boston Book Festival in October.
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Image courtesy of MIT Press

Do you have a great idea for a nonfiction book in science or technology, broadly defined? Editors receive hundreds of inquires each year. But what makes one book project stand out from the rest?

In the spirit of fun and fostering the Boston publishing scene, the MIT Press is hosting its first-ever Pitchfest competition.

Pitchfest will give six contestants the opportunity to present their best science or technology book idea before a panel of judges and a live audience at the Boston Book Festival on Oct. 13 in Boston. The winner will be given the opportunity to workshop a full-fledged book proposal with an MIT Press editor, get advice on how to navigate the publishing world, and receive a $1,000 cash prize.

The deadline for submissions is Sept. 1, after which time finalists will be selected and given offers to participate in the event. Pitchfest is an open competition and anyone is welcome to submit a proposal.

The MIT Press is a leading publisher of books and journals at the intersection of science, technology, and the arts. MIT Press books and journals are known for their intellectual daring, scholarly standards, and distinctive design.

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