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Raffle benefits day care scholarships

The Technology Children's Center, Inc. (TCC) is sponsoring a Razor Scooter raffle in support of its scholarship fund.

The MIT-based day care center, which serves 75-80 children in facilities in Eastgate and Westgate, was established more than 30 years ago. It offers programs for children from 15 months old through kindergarten age, with both half- and full-day programs.

"TCC's tuition rates are comparable to those at other university-based day care centers, but this still poses a financial challenge to many in the MIT community," said director Marcia Lieberman. "In addition to managing child care costs in a tuition-based environment, we're constantly faced with the need to serve a large graduate student population, as well as an international population which must deal with fluctuations in foreign currencies. We're even seeing a rise in the number of MIT undergraduates with children.

"We are extremely grateful to the Graduate Student Council, Dean Isaac Colbert and the Women's League, who recently pledged support to help graduate student families expand their TCC child-care arrangement or bring new families into TCC who currently do not have the resources to do so," Ms. Lieberman said. "There's always a need to increase our scholarship resources. The raffle of Razor Scooters is a way to raise scholarship funds and offer something to those in the community as well."

Raffle tickets will be on sale from 11am-2pm on December 19 in the Stratton Student Center lobby, and in Lobby 10 on December 18 and 20. The drawing will be held Wednesday, Dec. 20 at 4pm at TCC Eastgate. Participants need not be present to win.

Anyone with questions about TCC's programs and openings may call Ms. Lieberman at x3-5907.

A version of this article appeared in MIT Tech Talk on December 13, 2000.

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