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Three MIT engineering faculty win 2017 NSF CAREER Awards

Support will enable the exploration of new research terrains.
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With support from the NSF CAREER program, three rising faculty stars at MIT will receive funding to explore new frontiers and make a meaningful impact of everyday life.
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With support from the NSF CAREER program, three rising faculty stars at MIT will receive funding to explore new frontiers and make a meaningful impact of everyday life.
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Photo: Lillie Paquette/MIT School of Engineering

Three MIT faculty members are among the 156 researchers from around the U.S. who were selected for the 2017 National Science Foundation Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) program.

Ruonan Han, the E. E. Landsman (1958) Career Development Assistant Professor in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, will explore on-chip terahertz electronic frequency combs.

Luqiao Liu, the Robert Shillman Career Development Assistant Professor in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, will explore spin-orbit interaction based spintronics with superconductors.

Amos Winter, assistant professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering, will explore tuning passive prosthetic leg dynamics to create low-cost, robust devices that can replicate physiological gait in multiple activities of daily living.

"Resilient infrastructure, abundant food and water, affordable medical treatments, smart communities — these are engineering marvels that we all want to experience," said Barry Johnson, acting National Science Foundation (NSF) assistant director for engineering. "For each one of us, throughout our great nation, to reach the America of our dreams requires investment today in new generations of engineering researchers across the country."

Supported by grants from the NSF's Engineering Directorate, each researcher will set out with at least a $500,000 award and a plan to make advances in engineering. This year's awardees hail from 88 institutions across 34 U.S. states. 

In addition, over the past academic year, additional MIT faculty who have won CAREER awards across other NSF directorates and divisions include: Alexie M. Kolpak, assistant professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering; Robert J. Macfarlane, assistant professor in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering; Michael P. Short, assistant professor in the Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering; Matthew D. Shoulders, Whitehead Career Development Assistant Professor in the Department of Chemistry; and Caroline Uhler, assistant professor in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science.

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