Skip to content ↓

Boxes, books, and bananas: A peek at the MIT Science Fiction Society

Founded in 1949, group now maintains what may be the world’s largest open-shelf collection of science fiction.
Watch Video
Press Inquiries

Press Contact:

Kimberly Allen
Phone: 617-253-2702
Fax: 617-258-8762
MIT News Office

Media Download

An assortment of books from the MITSFS Library.
Download Image
Caption: An assortment of books from the MITSFS Library.
Credits: Photo: Jose-Luis Olivares/MIT
Laura McKnight is the “vice” of the MIT Science Fiction Society, meaning she serves as the vice president of the Society for the current academic year.
Download Image
Caption: Laura McKnight is the “vice” of the MIT Science Fiction Society, meaning she serves as the vice president of the Society for the current academic year.
Credits: Photo: Jose-Luis Olivares/MIT
D. W. Rowlands, president and "skinner," goes through the stacks in the society library. The Society strives to acquire every new science-fiction publication for its collection, sometimes obtaining proofs before a book is officially published.
Download Image
Caption: D. W. Rowlands, president and "skinner," goes through the stacks in the society library. The Society strives to acquire every new science-fiction publication for its collection, sometimes obtaining proofs before a book is officially published.
Credits: Photo: Jose-Luis Olivares/MIT
The MITSFS Library contains 62,370 books and 34,561 titles. Members can check out eight books at a time for as long as three weeks.
Download Image
Caption: The MITSFS Library contains 62,370 books and 34,561 titles. Members can check out eight books at a time for as long as three weeks.
Credits: Photo: Jose-Luis Olivares/MIT
One of the library’s collection of bananas hangs from a shelf. The bananas are available for check out. “Be warned that we have a digital electronic checkout system, and if you return the banana late, it will fine you,” McKnight says.
Download Image
Caption: One of the library’s collection of bananas hangs from a shelf. The bananas are available for check out. “Be warned that we have a digital electronic checkout system, and if you return the banana late, it will fine you,” McKnight says.
Credits: Photo: Jose-Luis Olivares/MIT
Books line every inch of space in the library’s home at W20-473. MITSFS also maintains a warehouse facility for extra copies.
Download Image
Caption: Books line every inch of space in the library’s home at W20-473. MITSFS also maintains a warehouse facility for extra copies.
Credits: Photo: Jose-Luis Olivares/MIT
One of the library’s more notable collections is its volumes of "Weird Tales," originally published in magazine form. The Society’s collection is full of stories that “you can’t really find many other places,” McKnight says.
Download Image
Caption: One of the library’s more notable collections is its volumes of "Weird Tales," originally published in magazine form. The Society’s collection is full of stories that “you can’t really find many other places,” McKnight says.
Credits: Photo: Jose-Luis Olivares/MIT
The wooden box that originally housed the MITSFS library in 1949. The box was originally passed from room to room. Now, it has become a time capsule. There’s only one problem, McKnight says: “Nobody knows when it’s supposed to be opened.”
Download Image
Caption: The wooden box that originally housed the MITSFS library in 1949. The box was originally passed from room to room. Now, it has become a time capsule. There’s only one problem, McKnight says: “Nobody knows when it’s supposed to be opened.”
Credits: Photo: Jose-Luis Olivares/MIT

*Terms of Use:

Images for download on the MIT News office website are made available to non-commercial entities, press and the general public under a Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial No Derivatives license. You may not alter the images provided, other than to crop them to size. A credit line must be used when reproducing images; if one is not provided below, credit the images to "MIT."

Close
Laura McKnight is the “vice” of the MIT Science Fiction Society, meaning she serves as the vice president of the Society for the current academic year.
Caption:
Laura McKnight is the “vice” of the MIT Science Fiction Society, meaning she serves as the vice president of the Society for the current academic year.
Credits:
Photo: Jose-Luis Olivares/MIT
D. W. Rowlands, president and "skinner," goes through the stacks in the society library. The Society strives to acquire every new science-fiction publication for its collection, sometimes obtaining proofs before a book is officially published.
Caption:
D. W. Rowlands, president and "skinner," goes through the stacks in the society library. The Society strives to acquire every new science-fiction publication for its collection, sometimes obtaining proofs before a book is officially published.
Credits:
Photo: Jose-Luis Olivares/MIT
The MITSFS Library contains 62,370 books and 34,561 titles. Members can check out eight books at a time for as long as three weeks.
Caption:
The MITSFS Library contains 62,370 books and 34,561 titles. Members can check out eight books at a time for as long as three weeks.
Credits:
Photo: Jose-Luis Olivares/MIT
One of the library’s collection of bananas hangs from a shelf. The bananas are available for check out. “Be warned that we have a digital electronic checkout system, and if you return the banana late, it will fine you,” McKnight says.
Caption:
One of the library’s collection of bananas hangs from a shelf. The bananas are available for check out. “Be warned that we have a digital electronic checkout system, and if you return the banana late, it will fine you,” McKnight says.
Credits:
Photo: Jose-Luis Olivares/MIT
Books line every inch of space in the library’s home at W20-473. MITSFS also maintains a warehouse facility for extra copies.
Caption:
Books line every inch of space in the library’s home at W20-473. MITSFS also maintains a warehouse facility for extra copies.
Credits:
Photo: Jose-Luis Olivares/MIT
One of the library’s more notable collections is its volumes of "Weird Tales," originally published in magazine form. The Society’s collection is full of stories that “you can’t really find many other places,” McKnight says.
Caption:
One of the library’s more notable collections is its volumes of "Weird Tales," originally published in magazine form. The Society’s collection is full of stories that “you can’t really find many other places,” McKnight says.
Credits:
Photo: Jose-Luis Olivares/MIT
The wooden box that originally housed the MITSFS library in 1949. The box was originally passed from room to room. Now, it has become a time capsule. There’s only one problem, McKnight says: “Nobody knows when it’s supposed to be opened.”
Caption:
The wooden box that originally housed the MITSFS library in 1949. The box was originally passed from room to room. Now, it has become a time capsule. There’s only one problem, McKnight says: “Nobody knows when it’s supposed to be opened.”
Credits:
Photo: Jose-Luis Olivares/MIT

It is a Tuesday night, and on the quiet fourth floor of MIT’s otherwise bustling Stratton Student Center (W20), the MIT Science Fiction Society (MITSFS) is holding open hours. Inside room W20-473, colorful books line the walls from floor to ceiling.

“We aim to have a library full of science fiction and fantasy and horror, and tangentially related genres, that we can make accessible to MIT, the community, and anybody else who’s interested,” says Laura McKnight, the Society’s “vice” — a role she describes as “approximately vice president” — for the current academic year.

Just inside the door, a small plywood box is stacked on its end. This, McKnight says, is the Society’s original library. When freshman Rudolf “Rudy” Preisendorfer founded MITSFS in 1949, members would pass their books from dorm room to dorm room in this box. Things have changed a bit in the last 65 years.

“Our total book count is, last I heard, 62,270,” McKnight says. “At one point, our goal was to collect all the science fiction that had ever been published. But with the rise of self-published science fiction, that’s not even sort of possible anymore.”

Still, MITSFS (pronounced “MITS-fiss”) maintains what is believed to be the world’s largest open-shelf collection of science fiction. The Society strives to acquire every new science fiction publication for its collection, sometimes obtaining proofs before a book is officially published.

The results are staggering: In addition to the two rooms of stacks in W20, MITSFS maintains a warehouse facility for extra copies. “We do all sorts of shenanigans to try and fit as many books as possible in,” says McKnight, adding that ladders are required to reach the top shelves of paperbacks.

The age of many of the library’s materials hints at how far MITSFS has come. McKnight points out “Weird Tales” — an anthology of stories from a science fiction magazine of the same name that was published from 1923 to 1954 — beside several other periodicals that were hand-bound by members over the years. Early science fiction was primarily published in magazines, McKnight says, and the Society’s collection is full of stories that “you can’t really find many other places.”

Learn about the MIT Science Fiction Society and take a tour of its library.

The culture of the Society also reflects the past. “Since MITSFS is so old, we have a lot of basically 50-year-old in-jokes that nobody remembers the origin of,” McKnight says. As evidence, she points out the library’s curious collection of bananas, which are everywhere — strung from the ceiling, tucked into shelves, and sitting on the limited desk space by the doorway. The bananas are plush, rubber, or plastic; one is dressed in chainmail, while another has a shark erupting from its peel.

McKnight says nobody knows how the fruit obsession began, but that members may check out certain bananas to take home with them. “Be warned that we have a digital electronic checkout system, and if you return the banana late, it will fine you,” McKnight says.

Most MITSFS members come to check out not the bananas, but the books — up to eight at a time, for as long as three weeks. Membership is not restricted to MIT students; McKnight notes that many alumni retain membership, and members don’t even have to be affiliated with the Institute at all — although MIT students do pay a discounted membership rate.

McKnight estimates that there are “some number of hundreds” of members this year. And Jesse Ashcraft-Johnson, a “keyholder” in the Society — he has a key to the stacks, and can hold the library open — thinks that if there were a single sheet of paper representing each member, they “would fit into a reasonable binder.” These members carry on a labor of love 65 years in the making.   

After wandering through the stacks, the “original library” by the doorway seems quaint. The box has now become a time capsule, McKnight says. There’s only one problem, she says: “Nobody knows when it’s supposed to be opened.”

For now, it remains sealed by the stacks, a testament to how far MITSFS has come.

Related Links

Related Topics

Related Articles

More MIT News

Wind turbines on the top of a hill

A healthy wind

Health benefits of using wind energy instead of fossil fuels could quadruple if the most polluting power plants are selected for dialing down, new study finds.

Read full story