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700 families arrive for a taste of MIT

Students' parents, grandparents and siblings experience campus through talks, tours and more as part of Family Weekend.
Family Weekend gives parents, grandparents and siblings a chance to experience campus through talks, tours and more.
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Family Weekend gives parents, grandparents and siblings a chance to experience campus through talks, tours and more.

Approximately 700 families are due to arrive on campus today to experience MIT during Family Weekend 2010. The annual event — hosted by the MIT Alumni Association — runs through Oct. 17 and offers students’ parents, grandparents and siblings opportunities to attend a class or a department reception, hear from President Susan Hockfield, and share lunch with a Nobel laureate.

Today’s Nobel laureate Luncheon — this year featuring Institute Professor Phillip Sharp, a world leader in molecular biology and biochemistry — is a popular event. Saturday morning, Hockfield welcomes families to talks by Associate Professor Alan Berger on "Creating from Landscape Waste" and Professor Angela Belcher on "Engineering Biology to Make Future Materials for Energy and Medicine." Families can also attend one of more than 70 open classes today.

Other events include tours of campus facilities, such as the nuclear reactor and the brain and cognitive sciences’ MRI facility; and a behind-the-scenes look at the theater arts. Just for fun, families can visit the MIT Museum’s Hack Lore exhibit, attend a chemistry magic show, or cheer on student-athlets in volleyball, basketball, rifle and quidditch. Concerts included a performance by the MIT Wind and Festival Jazz Ensembles and visits to living groups and a dorm-food tasting event completed the weekend.

To learn more about this weekend's events, visit the Alumni Association website.

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