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Paying it forward

When she’s not analyzing data about her favorite biomolecule, senior Sherry Nyeo focuses on improving the undergraduate experience at MIT.

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In the Media

National Geographic

National Geographic reporter Maya Wei-Haas explores how the ancient art of origami is being applied to fields such a robotics, medicine and space exploration. Wei-Haas notes that Prof. Daniela Rus and her team developed a robot that can fold to fit inside a pill capsule, while Prof. Erik Demaine has designed complex, curving fold patterns. “You get these really impressive 3D forms with very simple creasing,” says Demaine.

Associated Press

MIT startup Boston Metal is developing technology to decarbonize steel production, reports Ed Davey for the Associated Press. “Boston Metal said it can eliminate all carbon dioxide from its steel production and hopes to ramp up production to millions of tons by 2026,” writes Davey.

GBH

Prof. Nick Montfort speaks with GBH All Things Considered host Arun Rath about ChatGPT, its potential impact on the future of academia and how instructors could adapt their courses in light of this new technology.

Fortune

Research fellow Michael Schrage speaks with Fortune reporter Sheryl Estrada about how generative A.I. will impact finance. “I think, increasingly, we’re going to be seeing generative A.I. used for financial forecasts and scenario generation,” says Schrage.

Mashable

Prof. Daniela Rus, director of CSAIL, discusses the future of artificial intelligence, emphasizing the importance of balancing the development of new technologies with the need to ensure they are deployed in a way that benefits humanity. “We have to advance the science and engineering of autonomy and the science and engineering of intelligence to create the kinds of machines that will be friendly to people, that will be assistive and supportive for people and that will augment people with the tasks that they need help with,” Rus explains.

Boston Magazine

MIT researchers are developing targeted drug delivery through the use of nanoparticles to aid in cancer treatment, reports Simone Migliori for Boston Magazine. “Designed to circulate through the bloodstream, these small but mighty travelers [nanoparticles] can deliver a chemotherapy drug directly to a target cancer cell without disturbing any healthy cells along the way,” writes Migliori. “In doing so, patients may be able to avoid some of the worst side effects of chemotherapy drugs while still effectively treating their cancer.”

Bloomberg

Principal research scientist Eric Heginbotham and his colleagues speak with Bloomberg Opinion columnist Tobin Harshaw about their study simulating a Chinese invasion of Taiwan. “The project developed a war game with hundreds of tokens that include forces from the US, China, Taiwan and Japan,” Heginbotham and his colleagues explain. “Air and naval operations were played on a 5-by-6 foot map that covers the Western Pacific. Ground operations were played on a separate map that covers Taiwan.”

NBC

NBC 1st Look host Chelsea Cabarcas visits MIT to learn more about how faculty, researchers and students are “pioneering the world of tomorrow.” Cabarcas meets the MIT Solar Electric Vehicle team and gets a peek at Nimbus, the single-occupant vehicle that team members raced in the American Solar Challenge from Kansas City to New Mexico. Cabarcas also sees the back-flipping MIT mini cheetah that could one day be used in disaster-relief operations.

The Guardian

Postdoctoral fellow Timur Abbiasov speaks with Guardian reporter Henry Grabar about his research examining the relationship in neighborhoods between local errands and the geography of amenities. Abbiasov and his colleagues found that “the more commerce, parks and services in a neighborhood, the more people travelled locally, whether in the country’s most walkable cities or its least.”

Wired

Prof. Zachary Cordero and his team are working to develop an in-space manufacturing technique to design a satellite reflector that can monitor storms and precipitation through moisture changes in the atmosphere, reports Ramin Skibba for Wired. “It involves bending a single strand of wire at specific nodes and angles, then adding joints to make a stiff structure,” writes Skibba.

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Multimedia artist Erin Genia SM ’19 who is Dakota, an enrolled member of the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate, works to address social issues such as climate change and institutional racism through her art.

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MIT MechE innovates the traditional Mechanics and Materials II class by exposing students to leading-edge concepts of nanotechnology, nanomechanics, and metamaterials.

With eleven languages in his back pocket, rising senior Kinan Martin uses computer science and neuroscience to untangle the complexity of languages and the brain at the Natural Language Processing group in the Center for Mathematical Modeling (CMM) of the University of Chile.

When maintenance requires MIT to drain the teaching pool at the Zesiger Center, they reserve its last few hours with water for the dogs. Woof!

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