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The Committee on Animal Care solicits feedback

Image of the official seal of MIT, featuring two individuals, one reading a book, the other holding an anvil. The terms "Science and Arts," "Mens et Manus," and the year 1861 are listed along with "Massachusetts Institute of Technology."

The Committee on Animal Care (CAC) and the MIT vice president for research welcome any information that would aid our efforts to assure the humane care of research animals used at MIT and the Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research.

Established to ensure that MIT researchers working with animals comply with federal, state, local, and institutional regulations on animal care, the CAC inspects animals, animal facilities, and laboratories, and reviews all research and teaching exercises that involve animals before experiments are performed.

If you have concerns about animal welfare, please contact the Committee on Animal Care (CAC) by calling 617-324-6892 or email us at cacpo@mit.edu. The issue will be forwarded to the chair of the CAC and the attending veterinarian.

You may also contact any of the following:

•          Vice president for research: 617-253-3206, mtz@mit.edu

•          Director of the Division of Comparative Medicine or attending veterinarian: 617-253-1735, kpate@mit.edu, jgfox@mit.edu

•          CAC chair: 617-285-5156, hheller@mit.edu

All concerns about animal welfare will remain confidential; the identity of individuals who contact the CAC with concerns will be treated as confidential and individuals will be protected against reprisal and discrimination consistent with MIT policies. The Committee on Animal Care will report its findings and actions to correct the issue to the vice president for research, the director of comparative medicine, the individual who reported the concern (if not reported anonymously), and oversight agencies as applicable.

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