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Forbes

Mark Lee MS ’94 spoke with Forbes reporter Karen Walker about the success of Splashtop, a company he co-founded that is developing cloud-based software that allows secure and remote access and support.

TechCrunch

Research affiliate Jason Prapas founded Fyto, a company dedicated to developing hardware and software to automate and scale the production of aquatic plants, reports Christine Hall for TechCrunch. Prapas says that “Fyto’s technology taps into a farm’s waste streams as inputs to enable farmers to increase productivity and improve nutrient management while reducing production costs, water usage and greenhouse gas emissions, in some operations by over 50%.”

Forbes

Overjet, co-founded by Wardah Inam SM ’12 PhD ’16, has been awarded landmark clearance from the Food and Drug Administration to use their software aimed at detecting and outlining cavities in patients’ X-rays, reports Alexandra S. Levine for Forbes. “Everybody has had a dental disease,” says Inam. “People have had good and bad experiences. And moving the industry towards making [a] more clinically precise, efficient patient focus is something that will impact every person in the world.”

Forbes

Eureka Robotics, an automation company based in Singapore, has developed their products based on research from MIT and Nanyang Technological University, reports Catherine Shu for TechCrunch. “It [Eureka Robotics] focuses on robotic software and systems to automate tasks that require High Accuracy and high Agility (HAHA),” writes Shu. “Its robots are used for precision handling, assembly, inspection, drilling and other tasks.”

Forbes

MIT researchers have developed reconfigurable, self-assembling robotic cubes embedded with electromagnets that allow the robots to easily change shape, reports John Koetsier for Forbes. “If each of those cubes can pivot with respect to their neighbors you can actually reconfigure your first 3D structure into any other arbitrary 3D structure,” explains graduate student Martin Nisser.

Popular Science

Popular Science reporter Tatyana Woodall writes that CSAIL researchers have developed electromagnetic bot blocks that can reconfigure into various shapes and could potentially help astronauts build in space. “The electromagnetic lining of the 3D printed frames allows cubes to seamlessly attract, repel, or even turn themselves off,” writes Wood. “One cube takes a little over an hour to make, and only costs 60 cents.”

Forbes

Sajith Wickramasekara15 and Ashu Singhal ’11 co-founded Benchling, a software company designed to make it easier to keep track of laboratory data. The company has now acquired Overwatch, a software company for customers working in preclinical biopharma research, reports Alex Knapp for Forbes. “It [the acquisition] fits really nicely in the direction our company is heading,” says Wickramasekara. “It really helps us extend our offering, especially for biopharma where we’re growing a lot.”

Wired

Wired reporter Matt Simon spotlights CSAIL’s ‘Evolution Gym,’ a virtual environment where robot design is entirely computer generated. “There’s a potential to find new, unexpected robot designs, and it also has potential to get more high-performing robots overall,” says Prof. Wojciech Matusik. “If you start from very, very basic structures, how much intelligence can you really create?”

Scientific American

MIT researchers have created a virtual environment for optimizing the design and control of soft robots, reports Prachi Patel for Scientific American. “The future goal is to take any task and say, ‘Design me an optimal robot to complete this task,’” says undergraduate Jagdeep Bhatia.

TechCrunch

Tech Crunch reporter Brian Heater spotlights how CSAIL researchers have unveiled a testing simulator for soft robotic designs. “It offers some interesting insights into how compliant robots can adapt to different environmental changes,” writes Heater.

Fortune

Fortune reporter Jonathan Vanian writes that researchers from the MIT-IBM Watson AI Lab and IBM Research have published a paper and data set “intended to help researchers create deep learning systems that can create software code.” Vanian notes that “research like this could pave the way for more efficient methods for companies to test software, analyze code, and potentially build apps.”

ZDNet

A new tool developed by MIT researchers sheds light on the operations of generative adversarial network models and allows users to edit these machine learning models to generate new images, reports Daphne Leprince-Ringuet for ZDNet. "The real challenge I'm trying to breach here," says graduate student David Bau, "is how to create models of the world based on people's imagination."

Fast Company

New tools developed by CSAIL researchers allow users to design a pattern that can be used to 3D print knitted garments, reports Elizabeth Segran for Fast Company. “We’re exciting about how this can be used by everyday, nonexpert knitters,” says graduate student Alexandre Kaspar. “This lets anybody become a designer.”

WHDH 7

7 News spotlights how CSAIL researchers have developed two new software systems that are aimed at allowing anyone to customize and design their own knitted design patterns. “The researchers tested the software by having people with no knitting experience design gloves and hats,” explains 7 News reporter Keke Vencill.

BBC

Graduate student Alexandre Kaspar speaks with BBC Click about two new systems that ease the process of designing and making knitted clothing items. Kaspar explains that the systems allow users to “create building blocks of parts that are being knit.”