Skip to content ↓

Topic

Faculty

Download RSS feed: News Articles / In the Media

Displaying 1 - 15 of 992 news clips related to this topic.
Show:

New York Times

In a review for The New York Times, University of Bonn Prof. Irina Dumitrescu spotlights Prof. Kieran Setiya’s new book “Life is Hard: How Philosophy Can Help Us Find Our Way” Dumitrescu writes: “Setiya’s main goal is not to describe how things should be; in his view, given that there is much in life that makes us miserable, and that we can neither change nor ignore, we might as well find ways of dealing with the reality.”

CBS News

Prof. Richard Binzel speaks with CBS News reporter David Pogue about asteroids and the Torino scale, a 10-point danger scale for asteroids that he created. "All the objects [asteroids] we know of today reside at zero or one, which simply means they're so small that they don't matter, or that we know for sure there's no impact possibility," says Binzel.

Economist

In his new book, “Life is Hard: How Philosophy Can Help Us Find Our Way,” Prof. Kieran Setiya “aims to show how living well and hardship can go together,” reports The Economist. “Attentive readers of this humane, intelligent book will come away with a firmer grasp and better descriptions of whatever it is that ails them or those they cherish.”

Politico

At MIT’s AI Policy Forum Summit, which was focused on exploring the challenges facing the implementation of AI technologies across a variety of sectors, SEC Chair Gary Gensler and MIT Schwarzman College of Computing Dean Daniel Huttenlocher discussed the impact of AI on the world of finance. “If someone is relying on open-AI, that's a concentrated risk and a lot of fintech companies can build on top of it,” Gensler said. “Then you have a node that's every bit as systemically relevant as maybe a stock exchange."

The Boston Globe

Boston Globe reporter Kate Tuttle spotlights Prof. Kieran Setiya’s new book, “Life is Hard: How Philosophy Can Help Us Find Our Way,” which provides “a road map for thinking about life through trials both mundane and catastrophic.” Says Setiya: “You can’t really approach life without hope. The question isn’t really whether we should hope or whether hope is good, it’s always what should we hope for.”

Los Angeles Times

Los Angeles Times book critic Bethanne Patrick spotlights Prof. Kieran Setiya’s new book“Life Is Hard: How Philosophy Can Help Us Find Our Way.” Patrick writes that Setiya’s book demonstrates how “philosophy contains equipment that can help you survive and find renewed hope, if you know how to use it.”

The Atlantic

Prof. Kerry Emanuel discusses the impact climate change has on hurricanes, reports Robinson Meyer for The Atlantic. “First of all, you can have more intense hurricanes in a warmer climate. That finding goes back well over 30 years now,” says Emanuel. “For that reason we expect to see more of the highest-category storms—the Cat 3s, Cat 4s, Cat 5s, more of the Ian-style storms.”

Newsweek

Prof. Kerry Emanuel speaks with Newsweek reporter Pandora Dewan about Hurricane Ian and its correlation to climate change, reports Pandora Dewan for Newsweek. “What worries people in my profession is the confluence of two trends," says Emanuel. "One is demographic, one is nature. The number of people exposed to hurricanes has tripled since 1970 [as] people are moving in droves to hurricane-prone regions. Then the climate is changing, and that is demonstrably increasing the incidence of high-end storms like Ian."

New York Times

Prof. Richard Hynes is one of the winners of this year’s Lasker Award, reports Benjamin Mueller for The New York Times, for his work describing how “cells bind to their surrounding networks of proteins and other molecules — findings that pointed the way toward treatments for a number of diseases.”

Associated Press

Prof. Richard Hynes is one of three honorees for the Albert Lasker Basic Medical Research Award, reports Maddie Burakoff for the AP. Hynes and his fellow awardees “helped launch the field of integrin research, which has since led to new strategies for treating diseases,” writes Burakoff.

The Boston Globe

Prof. Richard Hynes is one of the three recipients of the 2022 Albert Lasker Basic Medical Research Award for his contributions to the field of integrin research, reports Martin Finucane for The Boston Globe. Hynes and his colleagues “provided a greater understanding of the diseases that can result when integrin function is perturbed.”

The Boston Globe

Prof. Peter Shor and three other researchers have won the Breakthrough Prize in Fundamental Physics for their work in the field of quantum information, reports Martin Finucane for The Boston Globe. Shor “invented the first quantum computer algorithm that was clearly useful. Shor’s algorithm can find the factors of large numbers exponentially faster than is thought to be possible for any classical algorithm,” the Breakthrough Foundation noted in its citation.

Forbes

The Breakthrough Prize Foundation has named Prof. Peter Shor one of the four winners for the Breakthrough Prize in Fundamental Physics for his work in the field of quantum information, reports Michael T. Nietzel for Forbes. “The laureates honored today embody the remarkable power of fundamental science,” says Yuri Milner, one of the prize founders. “Both to reveal deep truths about the Universe, and to improve human lives.”

The Guardian

Prof. Peter Shor, an expert in quantum algorithms, has been named one of four recipients for the Breakthrough Prize in Fundamental Physics, reports Ian Sample for The Guardian.

Scientific American

Prof. Peter Shor has been named one of four honorees for this year’s Breakthrough Prize in Fundamental Physics for his contributions to the field of quantum information, reports Daniel Garisto for Scientific American. All of Shor’s work, “led to new views of quantum mechanics and computing,” writes Garisto.