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WCVB

Kim Donohue will run the 2023 Boston Marathon to honor her husband, who was injured in the 2013 Boston Marathon bombings, and raise awareness for the Sean Collier Memorial Fund, reports Karen Anderson for WCVB. Donohue is “drawing inspiration from her husband and their friend, Sean Collier, an MIT police officer shot and killed just days after the marathon attacks,” writes Anderson.

WBUR

WBUR’s Pamela Reynolds spotlights “Symbionts: Contemporary Artists and the Biosphere,” an upcoming exhibit at the MIT List Visual Arts Center that explores “how organisms of different species live together and thrive because of it.” The exhibit highlights the work of over a dozen international artists and will be on display October 21through February 26.

The Boston Globe

MIT’s Leap Lab will be hosting a free event for children on Saturday, July 9th. The event will provide kids “a chance to explore the floating wetland on the Charles River through a microscope, learn to paint with algae, and compete in friendly engineering challenges with peers,” reports The Boston Globe.

The Boston Globe

Prof. Karilyn Crockett speaks with Boston Globe reporter Miles Howard about how transportation planning in the Greater Boston area needs to be centered around improving connectivity. “As Boston’s population grows, our public transportation infrastructure continues to crumble, and our transit planning can’t just be about new cars on one line and new tracks on another,” says Crockett. “It has to be a discussion about the system and the economic impacts of that system on Black and brown communities that are struggling to get to doctors’ appointments, to schools, to jobs that don’t allow working from home.”

The New York Times

Prof. Sherry Turkle writes for The New York Times spotlighting “The Fight to Save the Town,” a new book by Michelle Wilde Anderson. “Anderson’s book is an artful mixture of ethnography, narrative history, in-depth interviews and legal scholarship,” writes Turkle.

Radio Boston (WBUR)

Associate Provost Richard Lester and Prof. Noelle Selin speak with Tiziana Dearing, host of Radio Boston, about MIT’s Climate Grand Challenges. “To me, the Climate Grand Challenges effort really represents that we’re kind of at a frameshift when thinking about the climate problem. It’s not just a problem that some people can work on,” says Selin. “A climate challenge is a whole of society challenge, and therefore it really has to be a whole of MIT challenge.” Lester adds he hopes the challenges will “inspire a new generation of students to roll up their sleeves, put their shoulders to the wheel and help us solve this problem.”

Salon

A time capsule buried in 1957 by former MIT President James R. Killian and Prof. Harold Edgerton will be unveiled in 2957 a full millennium after its burial, writes Michele Debczak for Salon.

The Boston Globe

MIT celebrated the Classes of 2020 and 2021 during a special ceremony on May 28 that featured an address by Kealoha Wong ’99, Hawaii’s first poet laureate, reports Laura Crimaldi for The Boston Globe. “We may make some esoteric discovery or some small contribution to our industries, but most likely, our most significant impact will be in our communities and in our families,” Kealoha said. “Our impact will be felt in the way that we treat others and the way that we treat ourselves.”

The Boston Globe

Graduate student and violinist Lily Tsai recently performed in a benefit concert for the Newton Food Pantry and Community Freedge, raising over $1,000, reports Charlotte Howard for The Boston Globe. “Everywhere you go there are going to be people who love to play and give back to the community and bring joy through music,” Tsai said.

WBUR

Susy Jones, a sustainability project manager for MIT’s Office of Sustainability advises WBUR reporter Andrea Shea through her decision to eat 100% local foods for one week. “Making decision when you’re stressed is really difficult and that’s why I think it’s hard for anyone to eat healthy or local,” says Jones. “That’s why people at the end of the day end up getting fast food. So, we have to reduce the barriers for purchasing healthy local food.” 

Boston.com

MIT students gathered to take part in the annual Baker House Piano Drop, a 50-year tradition where a nonworking, donated, and irreparable piano is pushed off the roof of the Baker House on campus to mark the last day MIT students can drop classes for the spring semester, reports Heather Alterisio for Boston.com.

The Boston Globe

Boston Globe reporter Steve Annear spotlights the MIT Banana Lounge, an on-campus space that provides students with free bananas and a space to relax and unwind. “In 2015, the students batted around the idea of creating a welcoming, playful space for their peers to hang out, rest, or form relationships. Providing a quick snack would be a big draw, they realized, and helpful for students who didn’t have time for a meal between classes or to pick up fresh food,” writes Annear.

WHDH 7

MIT students gathered to take part in the Baker House Piano Drop, during which students drop a donated, nonworking, and irreparable piano off the roof of Baker House to mark “Drop Day”, reports Sabrina Silva for WHDH. “This year’s piano drop was made all the more special for students now that they’re back face-to-face enjoying their life on campus once again,” reports Silva.

GBH

Lecturer Susan Murcott and graduate student Imane Ait Mbiriq speak with Paris Alston and Jeremy Siegel of GBH’s Morning Edition about the MIT Climate Clock, a creation from the D-Lab that will be projected on the Green Building through May 27. “Our overall vision is that we have climate clocks in every K-12 school, in every university campus in the United States and even in the world, so that people can wake up to the reality of this new age and take action,” says Murcott.

State House News

MIT President L. Rafael Reif and Special Presidential Envoy for Climate John Kerry discussed the urgency of addressing climate change during the Climate Grand Challenges Showcase event, reports Chris Lisinski for the State House News Service. “Climate change has been called a ‘super wicked’ problem. In Boston, that might sound like a local way of saying ‘really hard,’ but this phrase is actually a technical term,” Reif said. “It describes any enormously complex societal problem that has no single right answer and no clear finish line as well as multiple stakeholders with conflicting priorities and no central authority empowered to solve it.”