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In the Media

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Popular Science

Popular Science spotlights a sampling of the winning pictures from this year’s MIT Koch Institute Image Awards, an annual competition showcasing some of the images produced as part of life science and biomedical research at MIT. “Today, high-magnification images can help design new medical tools, enrich our understanding of diseases, and explain how embryos develop. And, as shown by the 2023 winners from the MIT Koch Institute Image Awards, they can be works of art, too.”

WCVB

WCVB spotlights postdoctoral associate Matt McDonald and his efforts to prepare for the 2023 Boston Marathon. McDonald, who finished fourth in the American pack at last year’s marathon and first among New Englanders, says “the crowds are unbelievable. And knowing that you’ve done it at that point, makes it just incredibly emotional.”  

Popular Science

MIT engineers have developed a new technique that enables bug-sized aerial robots to handle a sizeable amount of damage and still fly, reports Andrew Paul for Popular Science. “The new repair techniques could come in handy when using flying robots for search-and-rescue missions in difficult environments like dense forests or collapsed buildings,” writes Paul.

The Boston Globe

Prof. John Horton and his colleagues have found that increases in Uber fares only benefit drivers for a limited amount of time, reports Kevin Lewis for The Boston Globe. “They found that fare increases initially provided drivers with higher hourly earnings, but that boost wore off after a couple months,” writes Lewis. “With the higher rates, drivers tried to work more hours and passengers used the service less, reducing the average time each driver was matched with passengers.”

The Boston Globe

Graduate students at MIT rescued a dog that was abandoned from a stolen vehicle, reports Kate Armanini The Boston Globe. “The students used the dog’s tags to contact the owner, who was ‘appreciative and emotional’ to be reunited with the dog,” writes Armanini.

The Boston Globe

Graduate students at MIT rescued a dog that was abandoned from a stolen vehicle, reports Kate Armanini The Boston Globe. “The students used the dog’s tags to contact the owner, who was ‘appreciative and emotional’ to be reunited with the dog,” writes Armanini.

Financial Times

Alum X Zhu-Nowell has been named the new artistic director of the Rockbund Art Musuem and will be relaunching the museum with a series of six solo-artist exhibitions, reports Caroline Roux for the Financial Times. “It’s a collection of solo projects that together form a group,” says Zhu-Nowell. “It shows the artists as individuals but not alone, and myself as part of a community.”

NBC

A new survey by Princeton Review finds that MIT is the top dream college in the country among college applicants, reports Lara Salahi for NBC Boston.

The Wall Street Journal

Wall Street Journal reporter Danny Heitman highlights Prof. Alan Lightman’s book, “The Transcendent Brain: Spirituality in the Age of Science.” Heitman writes Lightman’s “gift for distilling complex ideas and emotions to their bright essence quickly wins the day.” He adds that Lightman “belongs to a noble tradition of science writers, including Oliver Sacks and Lewis Thomas, who can poke endlessly into a subject and, in spite of their prodding, or perhaps because of it, stir up fresh embers of wonder.”

NBC

Dr. Akshay Syal, a medical fellow for NBC News, discusses how MIT researchers have developed a new technique to 3D print custom replicas of the human heart.

Smithsonian Magazine

MIT scientists have uncovered evidence that wildfire smoke particles can lead to chemical reactions in the atmosphere that erode the ozone layer, reports Margaret Osborne for Smithsonian Magazine. “From a scientific point of view, it’s very exciting to see this brand new effect,” says Solomon. “From a planetary point of view… it would be just tragic to have mankind screw up solving the ozone hole by deciding that we’re going to [allow] a lot more of these fires if we don’t mitigate climate change.”

The Boston Globe

Prof. Albert Saiz discusses how older Americans are impacting the real estate market in the Greater Boston area. “There’s a mismatch now,” saysSaiz. “As people age in place, these households tend to be two people or sometimes one person in maybe a three- or four-bedroom home. Since they’re not downsizing as we expected, we have a huge, huge need for bigger homes to host younger families.”

The Hill

A new study by MIT researchers finds that strategic placement of EV charging stations and creating systems to help stagger charging times could help reduce or eliminate the need for new power plants to handle the impact of EV charging on the grid, reports Sharon Udasin and Saul Elbein for The Hill. The researchers found that “better availability of charging stations at workplaces could help take advantage of peak power being produced midday by solar energy facilities.”

CNBC

MIT Legatum Center Executive Director Dina Sherif and Pia Sawhney write for CNBC about how the Silicon Valley Bank collapse will impact various companies, communities, and innovation ecosystems. “The immediate banking crisis is over,” writes Sherif. “Now it’s time to rebuild a new system for financing innovation to meet today’s needs.”