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Announcing the Dynamic Data-driven Environmental Systems Science Conference

DyDESS 2014 will unite scientists and engineers around Earth's systems science and engineering challenges.

Addressing the challenges in environmental sustainability requires an effective integration of sensing, observation and inference with physical, chemical, biological and social models. The necessary integration of data and science is multifaceted and symbiotic, with applications from model-based sensing to data-driven modeling. While the attendant issues of predictability, uncertainty, and risk reduction are of great interest in multiple areas of science, engineering, and mathematics, a rigorous forum to present collective advances has been missing.

The Dynamic Data-driven Environmental Systems Science (DyDESS) Conference, to be held Nov. 5-7 at the Marriott Cambridge, is envisioned as a premier conference coalescing the sciences with computation, systems science, and machine intelligence. It provides a forum for scientists and engineers in emerging environmental systems research and an opportunity for young researchers to meet leading scientists, and it brings together those interested in the dynamic data-driven application systems framework for environmental applications. It provides an interdisciplinary forum to help methodology meet application, and to showcase results and new, promising methodologies.

Keynote speakers include Carl Wunsch of MIT, who will present "Perspectives from Ocean State Estimation"; Maarten de Hoop of Purdue University, who will present "Imaging Earth's interior with Active and Passive Source Seismic Data"; George Haller of the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich, who will present "Objective Detection of Lagrangian Vortices in Unsteady Velocity Data"; and Dennis Bernstein of the University of Michigan, who will present "Adaptive Control and Model Refinement."

For more information, and to register, visit the DyDESS Conference website.

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