Skip to content ↓

Alumna takes up space on Saturday mornings

MIT alumna Emily Calandrell is the host of Xploration Outer Space, a weekend TV show about all things space.
Press Inquiries

Press Contact:

Jay London
Phone: 617-715-5200
MIT Alumni Association
Close
Calandrelli at the Mars Desert Research Station.
Caption:
Calandrelli at the Mars Desert Research Station.
Credits:
Photo courtesy of Emily Calandrelli
Emily Calandrelli (second from left) and Astronaut Cady Coleman ’83 experience weightlessness in the Vomit Comet with a team of MIT researchers on an episode of Xploration
Caption:
Emily Calandrelli (second from left) and Astronaut Cady Coleman ’83 experience weightlessness in the Vomit Comet with a team of MIT researchers on an episode of Xploration
Credits:
Photo courtesy of Emily Calandrelli
Calandrelli with former MIT President Charles Vest in 2010
Caption:
Calandrelli with former MIT President Charles Vest in 2010
Credits:
Photo courtesy of Emily Calandrelli

Move over Saturday morning cartoons, there’s a new space show in town. Emily Calandrelli SM ’13 is the host and co-producer of Xploration Outer Space, a new FOX series that explores space and big questions about Mars, astronaut life, and space travel for the K-12 audience.

Likened to the “female version of Bill Nye the Science Guy … without the bow tie” by the Boston Globe, Calandrelli draws from her dual MIT master’s degrees in technology and policy, and in aeronautics and astronautics to explain the science and technology behind space initiatives.

“At times it may be a little cheesey, but who doesn’t love a little cheese with their space?” Calandrelli jokes on her website of Xploration’s balance of educational and fun content.

In one episode, she shares what it’s like to train as an astronaut. To feel and then describe weightlessness, she rides the Vomit Comet at Johnson Space Center and visits the Neutral Buoyancy Lab, the world’s largest indoor pool, where astronauts get their minds and bodies ready for space.

She also talks with veteran astronauts, including MIT aeronautics and astronautics professor Jeffrey Hoffman about his first ride to outer space. “I had Jeff as a professor [while at MIT] but never had the opportunity to ask him about these experiences, and the show has allowed me to do that,” she says.

As part of a mock Mars field trip, Calandrelli sports an orange astronaut suit for an episode on Mars Desert Research Station in Utah. Researchers of this remote desert outpost are trying to simulate what life would be like on the red planet, so quarters are tight and food has a long shelf life.

For Calandrelli, the visit was a homecoming — she had served as part of the station crew through a two-week student internship in 2009. “I’m essentially picking things that I have found personally interesting in the past eight years that I have been studying in the field,” she said.

Upcoming episodes spotlight space travel, the Mojave Air and Space Port, and West Virginia University’s work on high-altitude space balloons.

Calandrelli holds a bachelor’s degree in engineering from West Virginia University and grew up in the same town as the late MIT President Chuck Vest. “He was an example of someone that can be incredibly successful and still relatable,” she recalls from a meeting with him as an undergraduate. “I hope to grow up to be similar to him.” (Read Calandrelli’s remembrance to Chuck Vest.)

Helping girls and boys relate to space might be the ticket for doing just that.

Xploration Outer Space airs Saturday and Sunday mornings on FOX. The Alumni Association plans to host an #MITAlum Twitter Chat with Calandrelli at the end of this month.

Press Mentions

Stat

Emily Calandrelli SM ’13 speaks with STAT reporter Pratibha Gopalakrishna about her work aimed at getting children interested in science, the importance of representation in the STEM fields, and her new Netflix show. “I don’t shy away from the science because I think kids are very clever and know way more than a lot of people give them credit for,” says Calandrelli.

Related Links

Related Topics

Related Articles

More MIT News