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WBUR

WBUR reporter Pamela Reynolds spotlights a new exhibit of Sharona Franklin’s work, which will be on display at the MIT List Visual Arts Center this coming February. “Franklin presents a new installation combining the themes of chronic illness with bioethics, environmental harm and holistic approaches to healthcare,” writes Reynolds.

GBH

Graduate student Olumakinde “Makinde” Ogunnaike and Josh Sariñana PhD ’11 join Boston Public Radio to discuss The Poetry of Science, an initiative that brought together artists and scientists of color to help translate complex scientific research through art and poetry. “Science is often a very difficult thing to penetrate,” says Sariñana. “I thought poetry would be a great way to translate the really abstract concepts into more of an emotional complexity of who the scientists actually are.”

The Guardian

Guardian reporter Oliver Basciano explores the work of the late artist Aldo Tambellini, who was a fellow at MIT’s Center for Advanced Visual Studies in the 1970s. “With his students he experimented with alternative documentary, collaborative film-making and live broadcast,” writes Basciano.

WBUR

Paul Ha, director of the MIT List Visual Arts Center, is serving as one of the advisors to Simone Leigh, the first Black artist selected to represent the U.S. at the Venice Biennale, reports Andrea Shea for WBUR.

Boston Globe

Boston Globe reporters Patricia Harris and David Lyon spotlight MIT’s public art collection. “A striking collection of modern sculpture, much of it tucked away in secluded courtyards and grassy quads,” they write. “Large-scale sculpture lives at the nexus of art and architecture,” adding that MIT, “has always been a school of imaginative can-do.”

Boston Globe

Writing for The Boston Globe, Cate McQuaid highlights Delia Gonzalez’s new exhibit at the MIT List Visual Arts Center. McQuaid notes that Gonzalez turns to “ancient civilization in search of meaning — specifically the eruption of Mount Vesuvius and the destruction of Pompeii, in the year 79.”

Boston Globe

The Boston Globe reports that Prof. Emerita Joan Jonas has been awarded the 2018 Kyoto Prize. The prize honors “important figures in the fields of advanced technology, basic sciences, and arts and philosophy.”

Boston Globe

Writing for The Boston Globe, Cate McQuaid spotlights “Gwenneth Boelens: At Odds” and “Charlotte Moth: Seeing While Moving,” two exhibits on display at the MIT List Visual Arts Center. McQuaid writes that “individual works in the exhibitions prompt bittersweet responses to lost utopias, uncanny associations of place and time, and heightened attunement to the senses.”

Boston Globe

“MIT professor emerita Joan Jonas, who represented the United States at the Venice Biennale, has been named the next visual arts mentor for the Rolex Mentor and Protégé Arts Initiative,” writes Meredith Goldstein for The Boston Globe. Jonas was named to the initiative along with five other artists.

Boston Globe

Boston Globe reporter Mark Feeney writes about photographer Ulrich Wüst’s show at the MIT Museum, his first exhibit in the U.S. Feeney writes that the wonder of Wüst’s show is “how diverse it is in subject matter…yet how consistent in spirit.”

Boston Magazine

The Rose Kennedy Greenway Conservancy, in partnership with MIT List Visual Arts Center, announced that conceptual artist Lawrence Weiner has been commissioned to paint the Greenway’s fourth temporary mural, reports Olga Khvan for Boston Magazine. “[Weiner] is known for his typographic works, such as his 2008 ‘Dead Center’ installation at MIT,” Khvan explains. 

Boston Magazine

MIT Lecturer B.D. Colen speaks with Boston Magazine reporter Chris Sweeney about his new photography exhibit, “Alone, Together,” which looks at how people riding the MBTA attempt to find some privacy.  Colen explains that the idea behind the exhibit “isn’t to invade people’s privacy. You’re in public, and I’m just documenting how people behave under these circumstances.”

Boston Globe

Boston Globe reporter Eryn Carlson writes about MIT visiting artist Anicka Yi’s exhibition, “6,070,430K of Digital Spit,” on display at the List Visual Arts Center. Yi explains that she wants the exhibit, “to be a totally encompassing experience, engaging the senses of taste, sight, smell, hearing.”

WGBH

In this video, Jared Bowen reports for WGBH on a retrospective of Professor Joan Jonas’ work at the MIT List Visual Arts Center. “One only has to experience it and you get immersed in it,” says List Visual Arts Center Director Paul Ha of Jonas’ work. 

BetaBoston

Nidhi Subbaraman writes for BetaBoston about research scientist Felice Frankel, who is credited with making scientific research more accessible through her photos. Prof. John Rogers of the University of Illinois says that Frankel, who is teaching an edX course this summer, has “played a significant role” in advancing science photography.