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TechCrunch

TechCrunch reporter Devin Coldewey writes about a new game developed by Prof. D Fox Harrell that is aimed at “identifying and navigating the subtleties of sexism” in the workplace. 

Wired

Wired reporter Brian Barrett writes that MIT researchers have developed a new system that allows virtual reality headsets to operate wirelessly. The system uses “millimeter wave (mm wave) technology, a large band of spectrum whose potential has gone largely untapped,” Barrett explains. 

New Scientist

Hal Hodson writes for New Scientist that MIT researchers have developed a system that allows virtual reality headsets to operate wirelessly. To solve the problem posed by sending vast amounts of data wirelessly, the researchers used a “different wireless technology called millimeter wave (mmWave), which is in a higher band of the frequency spectrum to that used by Wi-Fi.”

The Guardian

MIT researchers have developed a system that allows users to interact with video simulations, writes Joanna Goodman for The Guardian. The system “uses video to virtualize physical content so that it can interact with virtual content, so that when you see – on your smartphone – a Pokémon interact with a flexible object, you also see that object react.”

Scientific American

A new imaging technique developed by MIT researchers creates video simulations that people can interact with, writes Charles Choi for Scientific American. “In addition to fueling game development, these advances could help simulate how real bridges and buildings might respond to potentially disastrous situations,” Choi explains. 

NBC News

Alyssa Newcomb writes for NBC News that MIT researchers have developed a system that allows users to interact with virtual objects. Newcomb explains that the “technology could be used to make movies or even by engineers wanting to find out how an old bridge may respond to inclement weather.”

Popular Science

CSAIL researchers have created a tool that allows people to interact with videos, writes Mary Beth Griggs for Popular Science. The technique could “make augmented reality animations integrate even more with the 'reality' part of augmented reality, help engineers model how structures will react when different forces are applied, or as a less expensive way to create special effects.”

Popular Science

A new analysis by MIT researchers verifies the difficulty of the popular video game “Super Mario Brothers.” MIT researchers found that the game’s challenges belong to the “PSPACE” category of equations, “requiring exponential time to both solve, and to prove algorithmically,” G. Clay Whittaker of Popular Science explains.