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Boston.com

MIT students gathered to take part in the annual Baker House Piano Drop, a 50-year tradition where a nonworking, donated, and irreparable piano is pushed off the roof of the Baker House on campus to mark the last day MIT students can drop classes for the spring semester, reports Heather Alterisio for Boston.com.

The Boston Globe

Boston Globe reporter Steve Annear spotlights the MIT Banana Lounge, an on-campus space that provides students with free bananas and a space to relax and unwind. “In 2015, the students batted around the idea of creating a welcoming, playful space for their peers to hang out, rest, or form relationships. Providing a quick snack would be a big draw, they realized, and helpful for students who didn’t have time for a meal between classes or to pick up fresh food,” writes Annear.

WHDH 7

MIT students gathered to take part in the Baker House Piano Drop, during which students drop a donated, nonworking, and irreparable piano off the roof of Baker House to mark “Drop Day”, reports Sabrina Silva for WHDH. “This year’s piano drop was made all the more special for students now that they’re back face-to-face enjoying their life on campus once again,” reports Silva.

Boston Magazine

Boston Magazine’s Spencer Buell highlights the MIT Banana Lounge, a student-run operation that provides free bananas and also serves as a multi-functional meeting space for the community. “Of course, this being MIT, the students have totally optimized their free-tropical-fruit operation to get it down to (what else?) a science,” writes Buell. “Their commitment to smart banana storage and analysis of supply chains, not to mention documenting the merits of bananas over, say, apples, is truly something to behold. More data is involved than you would think.”

GBH

Graduate student Olumakinde “Makinde” Ogunnaike and Josh Sariñana PhD ’11 join Boston Public Radio to discuss The Poetry of Science, an initiative that brought together artists and scientists of color to help translate complex scientific research through art and poetry. “Science is often a very difficult thing to penetrate,” says Sariñana. “I thought poetry would be a great way to translate the really abstract concepts into more of an emotional complexity of who the scientists actually are.”

The Tech

Incoming Chancellor Melissa Nobles speaks with Tech reporter Srinidhi Narayanan about her academic trajectory, specific initiatives she is interested in pursuing as Chancellor and how she plans to incorporate student voice in decision-making. “In the Chancellor’s Office, we get to focus on the student experience inside and outside of the classroom, and we can help students grow into their whole selves here at MIT,” says Nobles.

Mashable

Mashable spotlights how MIT’s baseball pitching coach is using motion capture technology to help analyze and teach pitching techniques. Using the technology, Coach Todd Carroll can “suggest real-time adjustments as a player is pitching so that just one session using the technology improves their game.”

WCVB

WCVB-TV’s Mike Wankum visits MIT to learn about the Solar Electric Vehicle Team. “We are trying to prove that we can move away from cars that rely on gasoline or diesel,” explains undergraduate Salem Ali, “and move towards more electric vehicles, and potentially even vehicles that you don’t have to plug in.”

WGBH

The MIT Chorallaries, a co-ed a cappella group at MIT, compete in WGBH’s Sing That Thing! competition. “I have always been really interested in music, but also really enjoyed doing math and science in school,” explains third-year student Madeline Wong. “I feel like they are both integral parts of my life and I couldn’t have one without the other.”

WCVB

WCVB-TV’s Mike Wankum visits the Edgerton Center to learn more about the MIT Motorsports team, a group of students engineering an electric Formula SAE car. “We are here because we love it,” explains team captain and undergraduate Serena Grown-Haeberli. “Getting to see it drive, getting to see it race, sort of caps it off.”

Forbes

In an article for Forbes, Andrew Raupp highlights a pilot program debuted by MIT last year that allows students the option to receive a tamper-free version of their diploma digitally using Bitcoin’s blockchain technology. Raupp writes that, “Unlike a paper diploma, which could be easily lost or falsified, blockchain ensures that this important piece of data is never lost.”

Times Higher Ed

Times Higher Ed reporter Matthew Reisz highlights Prof. Daniel Jackson’s book, “Portraits of Resilience.” Reisz writes that, “MIT and its press are to be congratulated on a book – given out free to all this year’s new students – that not only addresses head on the issue of mental health within higher education but is so frank about how this plays out within its own institution.”

The Washington Post

Washington Post reporter Martin Weil writes about this year’s recipients of the Rhodes Scholarship. Two MIT students were named Rhodes Scholars this year - Mary Clare Beytagh and Matthew Chun. Weil writes that Chun is, “designing the first prosthetic knee intended specifically for use in the developing world.”

Boston Magazine

Boston Magazine reporter Hayley Glatter spotlights how two MIT seniors - Mary Clare Beytagh and Matthew Chun - were among this year’s winners of the Rhodes Scholarship. 

Associated Press

AP reporter Gene Johnson writes about this year’s group of Rhodes Scholars, which includes two MIT students, Mary Clare Beytagh and Matthew Chun. Johnson highlights how Chun, “leads a team designing the first prosthetic knee for use in the developing world.”