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Singapore-MIT Alliance for Research and Technology (SMART)

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CNBC

CNBC reporter Will Feur spotlights how researchers from MIT are working with 3M on developing a rapid coronavirus antigen test. The test “will be a paper-based point-of-care testing device, which will help reduce the cost,” Feur explains.

Reuters

Researchers from MIT and 3M are developing a new rapid antigen test for Covid-19, reports Carl O’Donnell for Reuters. “The test would produce results within minutes and could be administered on a low-cost, paper-based device, similar to a home pregnancy test, that could be delivered at the point of care,” writes O’Donnell.

TechCrunch

TechCrunch reporter Darrell Etherington writes that researchers from MIT and 3M are working on creating a new diagnostic tool for Covid-19 that can be manufactured cheaply and in large volumes for mass distribution. “The goal is to create a test that detects viral antigens,” Etherington explains, adding that the tests “provide results much faster than the molecular PCR-based test.”

Straits Times

The Singapore-MIT Alliance for Research and Technology (SMART) has launched an initiative aimed at advancing cell therapy research, reports Shabana Begum for The Straits Times. “Imagine providing the right living cells…to each patient as quickly and safely as possible,” explains Prof. Krystyn Van Vliet. "Delivering on that promise requires exciting changes in the way we understand, engineer, measure and select cells."

NBC News

In an article for NBC News about how climate change could make life unsustainable in the countries along the Persian Gulf and North Africa, Charlene Gubash highlights an MIT study showing that temperatures there and in southwest Asia, “will exceed the threshold for human survival if nations fail to reign in emissions.”

Straits Times

Institute Prof. Thomas Magnanti will receive Singapore’s Gold Public Administration Medal for his “visionary leadership” at the Singapore University of Technology and Design (SUTD), reports Jolene Ang for The Straits Times. Magnanti was cited for his work organizing the university in clusters, which “better supported the interdisciplinary nature of SUTD's programmes and strengthened SUTD's research capabilities.”

Newsweek

An MIT study finds that rising temperatures due to climate change will make the North China Plain uninhabitable by the end of the century, reports Newsweek’s Brendan Cole. The area could experience heat and humidity that is “so strong that it is impossible for the human body to cool itself,” Cole explains.

Axios

Axios reporter Andrew Freedman examines a new study by researchers at MIT and the Singapore-MIT Alliance for Research and Technology showing that China’s breadbasket, the North China Plain, could face severe heat waves. Big picture, writes Freedman, “such heat waves could both threaten lives and dampen economic output in the region, where 400 million people live.”

Channel NewsAsia

Researchers at the Singapore-MIT Alliance for Research and Technology have been awarded funding for two new programs aimed at addressing global challenges, according to Dewi Fabbri of Channel NewsAsia. Prof. Michael Strano will lead a project that uses sensors to monitor the health of plants, while Prof. Peter Dedon will focus on examining drug resistant organisms.

Associated Press

AP reporter Katy Daigle writes that climate change could drive heat and humidity to extremes in regions of South Asia. Daigle explains that, “with no limit on global warming, about 30 percent of the region could see dangerous wet bulb temperatures above 31 degrees C (88 degrees F) on a regular basis within just a few decades.”

CBC News

A new study by MIT researchers finds that climate change could cause deadly heat waves in South Asia by the end of the century, reports Nicole Riva for CBC News. The research demonstrates what could happen if “we keep going in this trajectory of no action related to climate change or minimal action,” says Prof. Elfatih Eltahir.

The Washington Post

Washington Post reporter Chelsea Harvey writes that MIT researchers have found that millions of people in South Asia could experience deadly heat waves by the end of the century. Without reductions in greenhouse gas emissions, “certain areas of South Asia are projected to occasionally experience extreme conditions exceeding the lethal threshold, including parts of northeastern India and Bangladesh.”

Time Magazine

Justin Worland reports for TIME on a new study by MIT researchers that shows by the end of the century millions of people living in South Asia could experience temperature and humidity conditions that exceed habitable levels. “The disastrous scenario could be avoided if countries meet their commitments to keep temperatures from rising more than 2°C (3.6°F) by 2100.”

Reuters

MIT researchers have found that by 2100, climate change could cause deadly heat waves in parts of South Asia, reports Chris Arsenault for Reuters. “Climate change is not an abstract concept, it is impacting huge numbers of vulnerable people,” explains Prof. Elfatih Eltahir. “Business as usual runs the risk of having extremely lethal heat waves.”

Guardian

Writing for The Guardian, Damian Carrington highlights a new study by Prof. Elfatih Eltahir that shows that without reductions in carbon emissions, millions of people living in South Asia could face extreme heatwaves. “The problem is very alarming but the intensity of the heatwaves can be reduced considerably if global society takes action,” says Eltahir.