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WBUR

Sculptor Matthew Angelo Harrison and artist Raymond Boisjoly will both have art installations on display at the MIT List Visual Arts Center this upcoming spring, reports Pamela Reynolds for WBUR. Reynolds notes that Boisjoly’s “latest work continues the artist’s practice of working with text, photography and images in consideration of how language, culture and ideas can be framed and transmitted.” Harrison, “has frozen union organizing artifacts into chunks of resin,” writes Reynolds. 

The Boston Globe

Boston Globe reporter Peter Keough spotlights artist JR’s new documentary “Paper and Glue,” which will be screened at the MIT List Visual Arts Center on Jan. 20. “JR takes on trouble spots around the globe, where he involves oppressed communities in creating the blown-up, immersive photo installations that are his oeuvre and which make a strong case that art can” change the world, writes Keough.

WBUR

WBUR reporter Pamela Reynolds spotlights a new exhibit of Sharona Franklin’s work, which will be on display at the MIT List Visual Arts Center this coming February. “Franklin presents a new installation combining the themes of chronic illness with bioethics, environmental harm and holistic approaches to healthcare,” writes Reynolds.

The Boston Globe

The Boston Globe highlights three new exhibits on display at the MIT List Visual Arts Center. New installations include “Andrew Norman’s two video pieces ‘Impersonator’ (2021) and ‘Kodak’ (2019); Sreshta Rit Premnath’s sculpture show ‘Grave/Grove’; and, in this era of stops and starts as we lurch from lockdown to reopening, the serendipitously named ‘Begin Again, Again,’ by the pioneering video artist Leslie Thornton.”

WBUR

In a new exhibit by Sreshta Rit Premnath, currently on display at MIT’s List Visual Arts Center, “nine pieces perform as a sort of breviloquent visual haiku, touching on pressing social themes outside museum walls,” reports Pamela Reynolds for WBUR. “I’m very aware that the area that I'm living in always enters into my work, sometimes in more abstract ways,” says Premnath. 

The Boston Globe

The MIT List Visual Arts Center has reopened with three new exhibitions, reports Riana Buchman for The Boston Globe. The new installation includes “Andrew Norman Wilson’s two video pieces ‘Impersonator’ (2021) and ‘Kodak’ (2019); Sreshta Rit Premnath’s sculpture show ‘Grave/Grove’; and, in this era of stops and starts as we lurch from lockdown to reopening, the serendipitously named ‘Begin Again, Again,’ by the pioneering video artist Leslie Thornton.”

The Boston Globe

The MIT List Visual Arts Center is presenting a series of remote artist-designed walks and experiences, aimed at helping people re-engage with their world and environment, which can be enjoyed anywhere, reports Cate McQuaid for The Boston Globe. “Artists can be pivotal in bringing us to re-engage with the world around us,” says List curator Natalie Bell.

WBUR

The MIT List Visual Arts Center is hosting the Max Wasserman Forum: Another World, which features “two prerecorded panel discussions that’ll touch upon subjects pertaining to art in the digital realm,” reports Magdiela Matta for WBUR. “This event will leave you thinking more critically about moving toward a future where there’s a world of endless possibilities in how we present media,” Matta writes.

WBUR

Paul Ha, director of the MIT List Visual Arts Center, is serving as one of the advisors to Simone Leigh, the first Black artist selected to represent the U.S. at the Venice Biennale, reports Andrea Shea for WBUR.

WBUR

Reporting for WBUR, Pamela Reynolds spotlights some of the MIT List Visual Arts Center’s virtual offerings. Reynolds notes that through one of their series, the List will be addressing “all the time we’ve got on our hands, with a series of online Zoom talks focused on experiences of waiting.”

Boston Globe

Boston Globe reporters Patricia Harris and David Lyon spotlight MIT’s public art collection. “A striking collection of modern sculpture, much of it tucked away in secluded courtyards and grassy quads,” they write. “Large-scale sculpture lives at the nexus of art and architecture,” adding that MIT, “has always been a school of imaginative can-do.”

Boston Globe

Boston Globe reporter Cate McQuaid spotlights the Ericka Beckman exhibit at the List Visual Arts Center. “Beckman models her incantatory, hallucinogenic films on the ritualistic repetitions of games and hard labor,” writes McQuaid. She draws on fairy tales and uses percussive, throbbing music. Woven together, these structures offer a desperate, frenzied model of life in a society driven by work, production, and the almighty dollar.”

WGBH

WGBH reporter Jared Bowen spotlights the Ericka Beckman exhibition at the List Visual Arts Center. Henriette Huldisch, director of exhibitions and curator at the List, explains that Beckman employed, “bright primary colors, she used toy-like props and she structured her films very deliberately around games and gaming rather than following traditional dramatic structure or narrative.”

WBUR

Reporting for WBUR, Pamela Reynolds spotlights “Ericka Beckman: Double Reverse,” on display at the List Visual Arts Center. Reynolds writes that through the exhibit Beckman explores “connections between games and gambling, the larger structures of capital, as well as the gamification of a culture which has given itself over to scores, challenges, tokens and rewards as a means of control.”

WBUR

WBUR reporter Pamela Reynolds spotlights the Rose Salane exhibit at the List Visual Arts Center, which examines the lost collection at the World Trade Center’s Port Authority Library. “In a suggestive display, Salane unravels a tapestry of seemingly disconnected events to trace the unfolding of history,” writes Reynolds.