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Fast Company

A new study by MIT economists finds that sleeping more may not improve performance or well-being, especially if night-time sleeping is often interrupted, reports Arianne Cohen for Fast Company. “The researchers say their findings suggest that sleep quality may be essential,” writes Cohen. “Participants experienced many nightly sleep interruptions, a saga familiar to anyone who lives with children.”

CNN

As part of the Vax India Now event on CNN, Profs. Bruce Walker, Peko Hosoi and Parag Pathak, along with senior research scientist Chris Caplice and MIT Medical Director Cecilia Stuopis, participate in a discussion led by Vijay Joshi, Editor-in-Chief of The Press Trust of India, about what India can learn from America’s experience with vaccine distribution. “It is absolutely [in the U.S.’s] interest to make sure that everybody in India gets vaccinated, that everybody in South America get vaccinated,” says Hosoi. “We really are all in this together.”

Bloomberg

Prof. Esther Duflo has been named to India’s new economic advisory panel, reports Ganesh Nagarajan for Bloomberg.

Fast Company

MIT startup Graviky Labs is partnering with the fashion label Pangaia to create clothing featuring graphics made from pollution sucked out of the air, reports Elizabeth Segran for Fast Company. “It’s an entirely new approach to carbon capture,” says alumnus and Graviky Labs co-founder Anirudh Sharma. “We’re literally extracting carbon particles from the atmosphere and selling it to the consumer.”

Popular Science

MIT researchers have created a new filter from tree branches that could provide an inexpensive, biodegradable, low-tech option for water purification, writes Shaena Montanari for Popular Science. “We hope that our work empowers such people to further develop and commercialize xylem water filters tailored to local needs to benefit communities around the world,” says Prof. Rohit Karnik.

United Press International (UPI)

UPI reporter Brooks Hays writes that MIT researchers have created a new water filter from tree branches that can remove bacteria. “The filter takes advantage of the natural sieving abilities of xylem -- thin, interconnected membranes found in the sapwood branches of pine, ginkgo and other nonflowering trees,” writes Hays.

The Washington Post

Writing for The Washington Post, Prof. M. Taylor Fravel explores how Chinese and Indian forces have disengaged and created a buffer zone at Pangong Lake on their disputed border. “The disengagement and buffer zone creates space for further talks,” writes Fravel. “In the short term, discussions have already begun to address disengagement in other “friction areas” such as Gorga/Hot Springs. Longer term, political talks about the border may be possible if a complete de-escalation occurs.”

The Washington Post

In an article for The Washington Post, graduate student Aidan Milliff and Saksham Khosla of Dalberg Advisors explore why farmers are protesting in India. Milliff and Khosla write that farmers are concerned that new laws aimed at deregulating agricultural markets in India could create a situation where “farmers would see less long-term stability, and could be at the mercy of big business.”

The Economist

MIT researchers have developed a new system that uses solar power to sterilize medical tools, according to The Economist. The system “should cost just a tenth as much to make commercially as a conventional autoclave of equivalent potency.”

New Scientist

New Scientist reporter Donna Lu writes that MIT researchers have developed a new portable, solar-powered device that could be used to sterilize medical instruments in resource-limited areas. “The new tool works even in hazy or cloudy conditions,” writes Lu. “It consists of a solar component that heats water to generate steam, which is then connected to a pressure chamber.”

Fast Company

Fast Company reporter Kristin Toussaint writes that a study by MIT researchers finds shutdowns and lockdowns caused by the coronavirus pandemic led to clearer skies and increased solar output in Delhi. “I think we’ve been able to get a glimpse of how the world can look like if we actually have clean air,” says research scientist Ian Marius Peters.

Quartz

A study by MIT researchers finds that, compared to India’s current policy of inducing states to buy electricity from renewable sources, increasing the price of coal is a cheaper way to reduce carbon emissions in India, reports Kuwar Singh for Quartz. The researchers found that implementing “a tax on carbon consumption or a carbon market for selling and buying permits will be more than 10 times cheaper in lowering CO2 emissions of the Indian economy.”

CNN

Graduate student Shekhar Chandra cites the work of Prof. Elfatih Eltahir in an article for CNN about the rising temperatures in India. “Experts at MIT say that even if the world succeeds in cutting carbon emissions, limiting the predicted rise in average global temperatures, parts of India will become so hot they will test the limits of human survivability,” writes Chandra.

Bloomberg

Bloomberg News reporter Mihir Sharma writes that a new study co-authored by MIT researchers finds that “intergenerational mobility has remained stagnant for Indians since the economy was liberalized in 1991.” For Indian Muslims, the researchers found that opportunities for upward mobility are declining.

Quartz

Quartz reporter Maria Thomas writes that MIT researchers found there is a lack of upward mobility available to Indian men born to fathers in the bottom of the socioeconomic distribution. The researchers found that the imbalance is the result of a “substantial rise in upward mobility for the historically-marginalised scheduled castes (SCs) and scheduled tribes (STs)… and a substantial decline for Muslims.”