Skip to content ↓

Topic

Drug delivery

Download RSS feed: News Articles / In the Media

Displaying 16 - 30 of 125 news clips related to this topic.
Show:

Xinhuanet

MIT researchers have developed tiny robots powered by magnetic fields that can be used to bring drugs nanoparticles from the bloodstream into a tumor or disease site in the human body, reports the Xinhua news agency.

New Scientist

MIT researchers have developed a new drug-releasing coil that could be used to help treat tuberculosis, reports Ruby Prosser Scully for New Scientist. Scully explains that the coil is “too large to leave the stomach, so it stays there, and the medicines threaded onto it leach out at a rate depending on the type of drug and the polymer the developers use to make the pills.”

BBC

MIT researchers have developed a pill that could potentially deliver insulin, which the BBC’s Adrienne Bernhard describes as “a kind of edible Swiss Army knife that can deliver life-saving medicine without the pain of needle injection.”

NIH

NIH Director Francis Collins highlights how MIT researchers have developed a new ingestible device, shaped like the shell of an African leopard tortoise, that can inject insulin directly into the stomach wall. Collins writes that, “this fascinating work serves as a reminder that when it comes to biomedical science, inspiration sometimes can come from the most unexpected places.”

ABC News

MIT researchers have developed a new ingestible capsule that in the future could be used to deliver medication to diabetes patients, reports Dr. Erica Orsini for ABC News. “The oral route is preferred by both patients and health care providers,” explains visiting scientist Giovanni Traverso.

New York Times

A new ingestible pill developed by MIT researchers positions itself against the walls of the stomach and can deliver insulin directly to the bloodstream, reports Gina Kolata for The New York Times. “It’s a very new concept and a really cool idea,” says Edith Mathiowitz, a professor of medical science and engineering at Brown University.

Financial Times

Financial Times reporter Clive Cookson writes that MIT researchers have developed an ingestible pill that can deliver insulin directly to a patient’s stomach. “This discovery has the potential to transform not only drug delivery but drug discovery as well,” explains Prof. Robert Langer, “since most current drug discovery efforts are aimed at creating small molecule drugs that patients can take orally.”

NPR

MIT researchers have developed a new ingestible capsule that can release insulin directly into the stomach and could be used to treat type 2 diabetes, reports Joe Palca for NPR. "We chose the stomach as the site of delivery because we recognized that the stomach is a thick and robust part of the GI tract," explains visiting scientist Giovanni Traverso.

Wired

Wired reporter Megan Molteni writes that MIT researchers have developed an ingestible capsule that could be used to deliver insulin to diabetes patients. The researchers were inspired by the leopard tortoise to create a self-orienting device that can position itself to deliver medication directly into the stomach. “The result was a roly-poly-pill that autonomously rights itself to be needle-down,” Molteni explains.

Associated Press

Associated Press reporter Lauran Neergaard writes that MIT researchers have created a pea-sized pill that, once swallowed, can deliver medications such as insulin directly to the stomach. “The way this works is it travels down the esophagus in seconds, it’s in the stomach within a few minutes, and then you get the drug,” explains visiting scientist Giovanni Traverso.

Stat

Inspired by the shell of a leopard tortoise, MIT researchers have developed a self-orienting ingestible capsule that can deliver doses of medication to the stomach, writes Megan Thielking for STAT. “If we’re able to deliver large molecules orally, it would not only change drug delivery but also drug discovery,” says Prof. Robert Langer.

Time Magazine

A team of MIT researchers has created a tiny ingestible device that deliver medications such as insulin directly to the stomach and could replace the daily injections used to treat diabetes patients, reports Alice Park for TIME. “We see no reason why someday this couldn’t be used to deliver any protein to the body,” says Prof. Robert Langer.

Boston Globe

Boston Globe reporter Martin Finucane writes that MIT researchers have developed an ingestible capsule that contains a small needle that injects insulin directly into the stomach. Finucane writes that the researchers “designed the pill with a special shape to ensure that it will fall and then orient itself at the bottom of the stomach so that the needle is facing toward the stomach lining rather than the stomach’s inside.”

HealthDay News

Researchers at MIT have developed an expandable pill that can stay in the stomach for a month and could potentially track issues like ulcers and cancers. “The pill is made from two types of hydrogels -- mixtures of polymers and water -- making it softer and longer-lasting than current ingestible sensors,” reports Robert Preidt for HealthDay.

The Washington Post

Washington Post reporter Peter Holley writes that MIT researchers have developed a new ingestible, expanding pill that can remain in the stomach for up to a month and could be used to help with weight loss or to monitor conditions inside the human body. “The pills could also be used to place tiny cameras inside the body that could monitor tumors and ulcers over time,” Holley explains.