Skip to content ↓

Topic

Drones

Download RSS feed: News Articles / In the Media / Audio

Displaying 1 - 15 of 93 news clips related to this topic.
Show:

Axios

Axios reporter Alex Fitzpatrick spotlights MightyFly, an aviation startup founded by Manal Habib ’11 that is developing a large, autonomous electric vehicle takeoff and landing cargo drone that has been approved by the Federal Aviation Administration for a flight corridor. "The use case is B2B expedited logistics," says Habib. "Think of deliveries from a manufacturer to suppliers. Think of deliveries from a lab to a hospital, or from a warehouse or pharmacy, as well as to improve deliveries to an oil rig or to a farm or a mining site, as well as for DOD use cases."

Forbes

Forbes reporter Rob Toews spotlights Prof. Daniela Rus, director of CSAIL, and research affiliate Ramin Hasani and their work with liquid neural networks. “The ‘liquid’ in the name refers to the fact that the model’s weights are probabilistic rather than constant, allowing them to vary fluidly depending on the inputs the model is exposed to,” writes Toews.

TechCrunch

Researchers at MIT have developed a new artificial intelligence system aimed at helping autopilot avoid obstacles while maintaining a desirable flight path, reports Kyle Wiggers for TechCrunch. “Any old algorithm can propose wild changes to direction in order to not crash, but doing so while maintaining stability and not pulping anything inside is harder,” writes Wiggers.

Popular Science

Popular Science reporter Jamie Dickman writes that using liquid neural networks, MIT researchers have “trained a drone to identify and navigate toward objects in varying environments.” Dickman notes that: “These robust networks enable the drone to adapt in real-time, even after initial training, allowing it to identify a target object despite changes in their environment.”

The Daily Beast

Researchers at MIT have developed a new type of autonomous drone that uses advanced neural networks to fly, reports Tony Ho Tran for The Daily Beast. “The new design allows the drone to make better decisions when flying through completely new environments,” writes Tran, “and could have future applications in self-driving cars, search and rescue operations, wildlife monitoring, or even diagnosing medical issues.”

TechCrunch

MIT researchers have developed Robust MADER, an updated version of a previous system developed in 2020 to help drones avoid in-air collisions, reports Brian Heater for TechCrunch. “The new version adds in a delay before setting out on a new trajectory,” explains Heater. “That added time will allow it to receive and process information from fellow drones and adjust as needed.”

Popular Science

MIT engineers have developed a new technique that enables bug-sized aerial robots to handle a sizeable amount of damage and still fly, reports Andrew Paul for Popular Science. “The new repair techniques could come in handy when using flying robots for search-and-rescue missions in difficult environments like dense forests or collapsed buildings,” writes Paul.

The Washington Post

Washington Post reporter Pranshu Verma spotlights Prof. Kevin Chen’s research creating flying lightning bug robots that could be used to pollinate crops in vertical farms or even in space. “If we think about the insect functions that animals can’t do,” says Chen, “that inspires us to think about what smaller, insect-scale robots can do, that larger robots cannot.”

The Washington Post

Postdoctoral fellow Joshua Schwartz and Texas A&M University Prof. Matthew Fuhrmann write for The Washington Post about their research to analyze whether armed drone operations reduce terrorism or make countries more vulnerable to it. “Armed drones may raise ethical concerns but appear to be an effective counterterrorism tool,” argue Schwartz and Fuhrmann. “However, the decision of when, how or even whether to employ armed drones remains a difficult one.”

Popular Mechanics

MIT researchers have developed firefly-inspired robots that can emit light while flying, reports Popular Mechanics. “The robots may be able to converse with one another because of this electroluminescence and, for instance, a robot that finds survivors while on a search-and-rescue mission, within a fallen building, could use lights to alert others and request assistance.”

TechCrunch

TechCrunch reporter Brian Heater spotlights multiple MIT research projects, including MIT Space Exploration Initiative’s TESSERAE, CSAIL’s Robocraft and the recent development of miniature flying robotic drones.

The Boston Globe

A forthcoming study by Prof. Erik Lin-Greenberg finds that the use of drones in the military could lower the risk of escalating an existing conflict, reports Kevin Lewis for The Boston Globe. Lin-Greenberg “presented members of the military with scenarios in which a US reconnaissance aircraft is shot down by a surface-to-air-missile from a hostile country,” writes Lewis. “The military decision-makers generally felt they had to escalate with force when the downed aircraft was manned, whereas that was generally not the case with a drone.”

WHDH 7

MIT engineers have created insect-sized robots that can emit light when they fly and could eventually be used to aid search-and-rescue missions, reports WHDH. “Our idea is, if we can send in hundreds or thousands of those tiny flying robots then once they find that survivor, they will shine out light and pass information back and signal people on the outside saying ‘we found someone who’s trapped,'” explains Prof. Kevin Chen.

Popular Science

MIT engineers have developed tiny flying robots that can light up, reports Colleen Hagerty for Popular Science. “If you think of large-scale robots, they can communicate using a lot of different tools—Bluetooth, wireless, all those sorts of things,” says Prof. Kevin Chen. “But for a tiny, power-constrained robot, we are forced to think about new modes of communication.”