Skip to content ↓

Topic

Design

Download RSS feed: News Articles / In the Media

Displaying 16 - 30 of 170 news clips related to this topic.
Show:

Financial Times

Hashim Sarkis, dean of the MIT School of Architecture and Planning, discusses how this year’s Venice Architecture Biennale examines our relationship with the planet and one another, reports Edwin Heathcote for the Financial Times. “The theme and the subjects we are exploring are exactly the same as those that led to the pandemic,” Sarkis says. “The questions around globalization, the erosion of the rural and urban edge, our relationship with other species, climate change, the polarisation of politics, exaggerated economic difference, mass migrations . . . ”

New York Times

New York Times reporter Sam Lubell spotlights how Hashim Sarkis, dean of MIT’s School of Architecture and Planning, addressed the theme of how we live together through this year’s Venice Architecture Biennale. “We now have a different set of eyes for how we see the world because of the pandemic,” says Sarkis. “But the issues are still the same. The pandemic helped bring them into focus and accelerate the kinds of responses we had been reluctant to make.”

New York Times

A new exhibition at the Design Museum in London showcases sneaker design, including the work of several MIT researchers, reports Elizabeth Paton for The New York Times. A sneaker designed by researchers from MIT and Puma “is home to microorganisms that can learn a user’s specific heat emissions and opens up ventilation based on those patterns.”

Financial Times

Financial Times reporter Ellie Pithers spotlights the contributions of several teams of MIT researchers to the future of sneaker design, currently on display at the London Design Museum. The “Breathing Show,” which was developed by designers from the MIT Design Lab and Puma, “is made from a molded material that contains cavities filled with bacteria; responding to heat generated by the foot, the bacteria eats away at the material to create a hole that allows air to enter and circulate.”

Dezeen

Hashim Sarkis, dean of SA+P and curator of this year’s Venice Architecture Biennale, speaks with Cajsa Carlson of Dezeen about how the field of architecture is transforming due to climate change, the Covid-19 pandemic, and efforts to increase diversity and representation. "Talent and imagination are not restricted to advanced development economically,” says Sarkis. “I hope this message comes across in this biennale.”

Fast Company

Fast Company reporter Mark Wilson writes that MIT researchers have developed a new light-sensitive paint, dubbed ChromoUpdate, that makes it easy for people to change the color and pattern on a variety of objects. Wilson notes there are a number of applications for ChromoUpdate, from testing out different colors on a product to “quickly projecting what is essentially data onto everyday objects could make smart homes even smarter, without the use of more screens in your house.”

The Boston Globe

In an article for The Boston Globe, Prof. Rafi Segal and Lecturer Marisa Morán Jahn explore how architecture can play a role in long-term care solutions. “As we rebuild our nation’s care infrastructure in this moment of economic recovery, we need to consider how the design of our cities and homes can enable the active participation of caregivers, elders, and people with disabilities in our democracy,” they write.

Mashable

Researchers from MIT’s Self-Assembly Lab and other organizations have created a new method to produce liquid metal, reports Mashable. The researchers hope “the new process will be used to change metal design and production processes and get applied in architecture components or product design.”

Associated Press

Hashim Sarkis, dean of the School of Architecture and Planning, speaks with AP reporter Colleen Barry about the Venice Biennale for architecture, which was postponed for a year due to the Covid-19 pandemic. Sarkis, who is serving as the curator, notes that he used the extra year to expand the show to seven sections “to deepen the discussion about architecture and its vital role in today’s society.”

The Boston Globe

Through his art and information-based work, Prof. Ekene Ijeoma “finds the humanity in data points,” writes Cate McQuaid for The Boston Globe. Ijeoma hopes his work - including “A Counting,” a sonic poem featuring recordings of people from around the world counting to 100, and the virtual Black Mobility and Safety Seminar hosted by his research team - bridges “the gap between facts and feelings. It gets to ‘what are the things being felt when experiencing this?’”

New York Times

Prof. Ekene Ijeoma has been collecting video recordings of people counting to 100 in different languages and dialects for the past year as part of his project “A Counting,” and is now soliciting videos of people counting to 100 in sign language, writes Sophie Haigney for The New York Times. Ijeoma explains that he hopes the artwork will constantly evolve “into a more whole representation of society.”

Fast Company

Fast Company reporter Nate Berg highlights Ori, an MIT startup that makes motorized furniture that can be used to transform small spaces. 

The Boston Globe

Nobull, a direct-to-consumer fitness brand co-founded by alumnus Marcus Wilson MBA ’04, is releasing a line of apparel designed by Boston teens, as part of an effort with Artists for Humanity to help connect under-resourced teens with opportunities in arts and design, reports Anissa Gardizy for The Boston Globe

Boston Business Journal

Boston Business Journal reporter Catherine Carlock spotlights how MIT has submitted plans for the second phase of the Volpe redevelopment in Kendall Square. “The second phase could house a combined 1,400 residential units; 1.7 million square feet of lab, research and office space; a 20,000-square-foot community center; 3.5 acres of open space and other retail, entertainment and cultural facilities,” writes Carlock.

Fast Company

Fast Company reporter Rachel Raczka spotlights Season Three, a startup founded by three MIT graduates aimed at designing a shoe that fits “practical parameters but performed like a stylish, everyday sneaker that you wouldn’t dread wearing.”