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Boston.com

Boston.com reporter Melissa Ellin spotlights the MIT AgeLab’s Age Gain Now Empathy System (AGNES), “a suit that allows wearers to feel what it is like to be 80 years old with some chronic health conditions,” writes Ellin. The suit was recently featured in “Limitless with Chris Hemsworth,” a docuseries highlighting scientific research and insight into the human body.

Forbes

Writing for Forbes, Joseph Coughlin, director of the MIT AgeLab, highlights the safety concerns associated with shrinking airlines seats. “Tightening seating is argued to be a threat to a speedy emergency evacuation and even the cause of dangerous health conditions such as blood clots,” writes Coughlin.

Forbes

Joseph Coughlin, director of the MIT AgeLab, writes for Forbes about the three major risk factors to consider when planning where to live in retirement. “Retirement planning can’t control the weather,” writes Coughlin. “However, critically and realistically assessing our personal resilience and how to best prepare for the possible risks of where I live, is a critical element to thinking about how I will live in older age.”

Forbes

MIT AgeLab director Joseph Coughlin writes for Forbes about why many former retirees are returning to the workforce. “These older adults are inventing something that is neither our current idea of retirement or of work,” writes Coughlin. “They are quietly creating something else — a new life stage altogether that sees the retirement age of today as a mile marker, not an exit.”

New York Times

Sharing automated vehicle data with the public can fundamentally change the way regulators, police departments, insurance companies and other organization understand the risks of drive-assistance systems, report Cade Metz and Ella Koeze for The New York Times. “This can help separate crashes related to technology from crashes related to driver error,” says research engineer Bryan Reimer.

Forbes

Joseph Coughlin, Director of the MIT AgeLab, writes for Forbes about Serena William’s recent retirement announcement and the evolving concept of retirement. “Tennis star Serena Williams announced her ‘retirement’ from tennis this week while challenging the very idea of retirement,” writes Coughlin. “Williams is not alone. Many people, far older than her 41 years, are declaring retirement a dated term best left to past generations and another era.”

Forbes

Writing for Forbes, Joseph Coughlin, director of the MIT AgeLab, emphasizes the importance of friendships in retirement. “Comprehensive longevity planning is about living well in later life, not just financial planning,” writes Coughlin. “Without rich social connections, health, even coupled with ample wealth, might still result in unhappiness in older age. It appears that men, in particular, must work harder than most women to invest and build their social portfolio.”

Automotive News

Research scientist Bryan Reimer and his colleagues have been collecting data from vehicles with driver-assist technology for the last seven years, writes Pete Bigelow for Automotive News. “We desperately need to understand the denominators, the frequency of events and the behaviors underlying them to understand the benefits and limitations of automated and assisted driving,” says Reimer. “We need to understand which aspects are working well and which ones need refining.”

Wired

A study by MIT AgeLab research scientist Bryan Reimer found that drivers using autopilot were “more likely to look away from the road once the system was on,” reports Aarian Marshall for Wired. “With automation comes an inherent new level of complexities. There are lots of risks and lots of rewards,” says Reimer.

Forbes

Joseph Coughlin, director of the MIT AgeLab, writes for Forbes about the new meaning of a career and how employers, parents, institutions must adapt in the new age of technology. “Institutions must prepare young people to learn for a lifetime – not just for one profession that may be in high demand today, only to fade tomorrow,” writes Coughlin.

Forbes

Joseph Coughlin, director of the MIT AgeLab, writes for Forbes about the impact Baby Boomer and Gen X retirement can have on the increasing labor shortage in the United States. “While some millennials can’t wait for the Boomers and older Gen X’ers to step aside in the job market, there are critical labor shortfalls in many key industries that will be sharply felt by Millennials as consumers and as the next generation of leadership in business and government,” writes Coughlin.

The Boston Globe

Boston Globe reporter Robert Weisman spotlights how researchers at the MIT AgeLab are “designing prototypes of ‘smart homes’ for older residents, equipped with social robots, voice-activated speakers that give medication reminders, motion sensors embedded in carpets to detect falls, and intelligent doorbells that double as security cameras.”

Forbes

In an article for Forbes, Joseph Coughlin, director of the MIT AgeLab, explores what Betty White’s long life and career can teach us about longevity, work and retirement. “We will all miss Betty White,” writes Coughlin. “However, if we only remember her lifetime of work for the smiles that she brought to our faces, we may have missed her finest role – how to live a long life, well.”

U.S. News & World Report

U.S. News & World Report reporter Coryanne Hicks spotlights MIT AgeLab director Joe Coughlin’s paper which explores how Americans reevaluated their retirement plans as a result of the pandemic.

The Boston Globe

Joseph Coughlin, director of the MIT AgeLab, and Luke Yoquinto, a research associate at the AgeLab, emphasize the importance of increased investment in aging-related research in an article for The Boston Globe. Coughlin and Yoquinto call for “ramping up age-related disease research across the board: not just in health care and robotics, but also in smart-home tech, user design, transportation, workplace technologies, education and training, and nutrition. R&D in these fields won’t just improve lives; it will also strengthen tomorrow’s economy.”