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CBC News

CBC News reporter Matthew Braga writes that MIT researchers have designed a system that can 3-D print the basic structure of buildings. The researchers believe the system could one day be used to “build structures in extreme or inhospitable environments — say, the aftermath of an earthquake, or even on another planet.”

WCVB

In this WCVB segment, CSAIL postdocs Robert MacCurdy and Jeffrey Lipton explain their work developing a shock-absorbing material that could be used to help protect robots and smartphones, or in helmets. Liquid is used in the material to “absorb the energy and keep it inside,” Lipton explains.

Fox News

Grace Williams reports for FOX News that CSAIL researchers are 3-D printing shock-absorbing skins to protect robots. “Dubbed the ‘programmable viscoelastic material’ (PVM) technique, MIT’s printing method gives objects the precise stiffness or elasticity they require,” writes Williams.

CNN

To develop safer, more durable robots, CSAIL researchers have developed a technique to 3-D print robots with shock-absorbing skins, reports Matt McFarland for CNN. McFarland explains that as the “‘bumpers’ aren't rigid, it's less dangerous for a robot to crash into something.”

Popular Science

Popular Science reporter Mary Beth Griggs writes that researchers from MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab have developed a method to 3-D print robots with customized shock absorbers. The researchers hope that the “shock absorbing material could be used to create better shock absorbers for delivery drones, shock-resistant shoe soles, and even helmets.”

HuffPost

Oscar Williams writes for The Huffington Post about a new prototype for a glasses-free, 3-D movie screen developed by CSAIL researchers. The prototype "harnesses a blend of lenses and mirrors to enable viewers to watch the film from any seat in the house.”

CBS News

In this CBS News article, Michelle Star writes that CSAIL researchers have developed a method that allows moviegoers to see 3-D movies without wearing glasses. Star notes that the prototype “has been demonstrated in an auditorium, where all viewers saw 3-D images of a consistently high resolution.”

CNN Money

By projecting images through multiple lenses and mirrors, CSAIL researchers have developed a new prototype movie screen that allows viewers to see 3-D images without glasses, reports Aaron Smith for CNN Money. 

Popular Science

MIT researchers have developed a prototype for a cinema-sized 3-D movie screen that would allow users to watch 3-D movies without glasses, reports Mary Beth Griggs for Popular Science. As people generally sit in fixed seats in a cinema, the researchers developed a prototype that “can tailor a set of images for each individual seat in the theater.”

Boston.com

CSAIL researchers have developed a way for people to watch 3-D movies without glasses, writes Kevin Slane for Boston.com. The new display the researchers developed “would use a series of lenses and mirrors to allow audiences to see the same three-dimensional image from any seat in a theater.”

CNN

Janissa Delzo writes for CNN that MIT researchers have developed a platform to 3-D print thousands of hair-like structures in minutes. "The purpose of this project is looking beyond the aesthetic perspective," explains graduate student Jifei Ou. "What kind of new functionality can we bring to the material?"

The Washington Post

Washington Post reporter Matt McFarland writes that MIT researchers have developed a technique for printing solid and liquid materials at the same time, a development that could make producing robots faster and easier. Prof. Daniela Rus explains that the new process could make “a big difference in what kind of machines you can make.”

Popular Science

Popular Science reporter Kelsey Atherton writes that a new 3-D printing process developed by MIT researchers incorporates both solid and liquid materials at the same time. Atherton explains that the prototype robot developed using the process walks “with hydraulic bellows, fluid pumping in and out to turn a crankshaft that moves the legs back and forth.”

CBS News

Researchers from MIT CSAIL have developed a new 3-D printing process that produces robots with no assembly required, reports Brian Mastroianni for CBS News. “MIT's new process is significant in that the production period is streamlined, with the robot's solid and liquid hydraulic parts being created in one step,” Mastroianni explains. 

Boston Magazine

Boston Magazine reporter Jamie Ducharme writes that MIT researchers have developed a way to simultaneously 3-D print liquid and solid materials, “allowing them to create functional, nearly assembly-free robots.”