Skip to content ↓

Topic

space

Download RSS feed: News Articles / In the Media

Displaying 1 - 15 of 395 news clips related to this topic.
Show:

Bloomberg TV

Professor Danielle Wood joins Bloomberg Markets: The Close to discuss billionaires travelling to space and the sustainability and ethics of space travel. “Do we want to reproduce some of the same mistakes…on places like the moon and Mars that we’ve done on Earth,” says Wood. “Or would we rather preserve and conserve the natural beauty of these environments from the beginning of human activity?”

NECN

Michael Hecht of MIT’s Haystack Observatory speaks with Perry Russom of NECN about MOXIE, a new experimental device that will convert carbon dioxide in the Marian atmosphere into oxygen. Hecht explains that the inspiration for MOXIE lies in how it would be easier, “if we could make that oxygen on Mars and not have to bring this huge honking oxygen tank with us all the way from Earth.”

Vox

Prof. Tanja Bosak speaks with Vox reporter Brian Resnick about how Martian materials collected by the Perseverance rover might provide clues about early life forms on Earth. "These [Martian] rocks are older, by half a billion or a billion years, than anything that’s well preserved that we have on Earth,” says Bosak.

Boston Globe

Boston Globe reporter Caroline Enos spotlights the contributions of MIT researchers to the Mars 2020 mission, in particular the Mars Oxygen In-Situ Resource Utilization Experiment or MOXIE. “MOXIE could have a big impact on future missions if it is successful,” Enos explains.

Smithsonian Magazine

Haystack’s Michael Hecht, the principal investigator for the Mars MOXIE experiment, speaks with Max G. Levy of Smithsonian about the challenges involved in developing MOXIE’s oxygen-producing technology. “We want to show we can run [MOXIE] in the daytime, and the nighttime, in the winter, and in the summer, and when it’s dusty out," says Hecht, "in all of the different environments."

CNN

CNN’s Ashley Strickland highlights how MOXIE, a device that the Mars 2020 rover will carry on board to convert carbon dioxide into oxygen, could aid future human exploration of Mars. "MOXIE is so you don't have to take an estimated 27 metric tons of oxygen to Mars just to get them off the surface," said Dr. Mike Hecht, principle investigator for MOXIE.

Economist

The Economist explores how the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS), an MIT-led NASA mission, has identified a number of new exoplanets and, in the process, helped astronomers and scientists unearth new details about our universe. This latest discovery, according to The Economist, “will help answer some of the biggest questions in the rapidly growing science of exoplanetology.”

US News & World Report

Cecelia Smith-Schoenwalder writes for US News & World Report about the planet hunting satellite TESS, which has recently discovered three new exoplanets. "The pace and productivity of TESS in its first year of operations has far exceeded our most optimistic hopes for the mission," said Senior Research Scientist George Ricker, TESS's principal investigator.

The Boston Globe

Martin Finucane reports for The Boston Globe on the latest findings of the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite, “a NASA Astrophysics Explorer mission led and operated by MIT and managed by NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center,” which hunts for exoplanets. TESS recently discovered a rocky super-Earth and two sub-Neptunes in a system known as TOI-270.

CNN

A new MIT study shows that NASA’s Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) has discovered three new exoplanets in a system known as TOI-270. “The newly discovered exoplanets are some of the smallest and closest ever found,” reports Ashley Strickland for CNN. “All three planets are similar in size, which is very different from our own solar system filled with extremes.”

Science

Postdoc Maximilian Günther is the lead author on a paper showing that NASA’s TESS satellite has discovered three new exoplanets. “The exoplanets are of a type that does not exist in our solar system, being between the Earth and Neptune in size,” writes Daniel Clery for Science.  “That makes the closely packed system, known as TOI-270, a good bet for answering long-standing questions about how such ‘super-Earths’ or ‘mini-Neptunes’ form.”

New Scientist

TESS, an MIT-led NASA mission, has discovered two gaseous exoplanets and one rocky exoplanet within a system known as TOI-270, reports New Scientist. “TOI-270 will soon allow us to study this ‘missing link’ between rocky Earth-like planets and gas-dominant mini-Neptunes, because here all of these types formed in the same system,” says postdoc Maximilian Günther, lead author of a paper on the new system. 

New York Times

The New York Times’ Dennis Overbye reports on a paper from MIT, which shows that NASA’s planet hunting satellite TESS has discovered three new exoplanets in a system 73 light-years from Earth known as TOI-270. “TOI-270 is a true Disneyland for exoplanet science because it offers something for every research area,” says postdoc and lead author Maximilian Günther. “It is an exceptional laboratory for not one, but many reasons.”

WBUR

Prof. Dava Newman speaks with WBUR’s Sharon Brody about the impact of the Apollo program on her own career and on humanity at large. Newman, who notes that the success of the Apollo 11 mission, “taught her to dream,” notes that, “if you're going to do the big, audacious engineering, technological, scientific breakthroughs? Well, you have to take risks.”

Popular Mechanics

In an article originally written for Popular Mechanics for the 25th anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing, MIT alumnus Buzz Aldrin makes a case for why Americans should aim to travel to the Moon again. “A return to the Moon offers a way to leverage an evolutionary expansion of our capability in space,” Aldrin wrote.