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CNBC

Amazon workers from Staten Island have become the first group to vote in favor of unionizing, reports Ari Levy and Annie Palmer for CNBC. “I would expect now that there is this first victory on the part of a union that Amazon is going to have to reassess its labor relations strategy and begin to negotiate in good faith to reach an agreement,” says Prof. Tom Kochan.

CNBC

CNBC reporter Jennifer Liu spotlights a new study by researchers from the Sloan School of Management who found that the biggest factor that leads people to quit their jobs is a toxic work culture. Senior lecturer Donald Sull says, “what’s significant is that toxic workplace factors lead to a ‘stronger reaction’ – quitting – more so than other bad work issues,” writes Liu.

Fast Company

Writing for Fast Company, Prof. Erin Kelly emphasizes the need for employers to implement management practices that support the health and wellness of employees. “Forward-thinking business leaders can adopt sound strategies to reduce the negative impact common management practices have on employee health and well-being,” writes Kelly.

Boston Globe

Boston Globe reporter Angela Yang spotlights how the MIT Sloan School of Management has been offering a virtual speaker series focused on preparing students for a changing work and business landscape. Prof. Erin Kelly, who worked on a toolkit launched in July aimed at helping employers create more supportive work cultures, noted that it’s "an exciting moment, because we may be ready to look at how work can be more sane and sustainable across all kinds of occupations.”

The Wall Street Journal

Writing for The Wall Street Journal, Prof. Kate Kellogg explores how managers can more effectively help their employees transition to using new technologies. “Managers need to realize that introducing emerging technologies such as artificial intelligence, data analytics and robotics aren’t straightforward,” writes Kellogg. “Managers who hope to successfully implement these technologies need to focus on issues of employee status and roles, and the amount of new work that will need to be done.”

Fast Company

Fast Company reporter Stephanie Vozza writes that Prof. Erin Kelly has found greater flexibility in work schedules and location resulted in higher levels of employee well-being and job satisfaction. “Our study found that increasing employees’ say in when, where, and how they do their work, and conveying support for their personal and family life, both improved well-being and reduced turnover, reducing costs for the company, too,” says Kelly.

Forbes

Writing for Forbes, Joseph Coughlin, director of the MIT AgeLab, makes the case that society is undergoing a Great Reframing in the wake of the Covid-19 pandemic. “The pandemic, with far more impact than the Great Recession, has created a new psychosocial equilibrium — a renewed and heightened vigilance and priority to determine what is truly important and to make choices accordingly,” writes Coughlin. “Our view of life has been reframed.”

Fortune

In an article for Fortune, Prof. Erin Kelly and Prof. Phyllis Moen of the University of Minnesota explore how to craft effective hybrid work policies that can benefit both employees and employers. Kelly and Moen advocate for “inviting teams to discuss and learn from how they adapted during the pandemic and how they struggled, and to imagine what might work well for them.”

New York Times

Writing for The New York Times, senior lecturer Robert Pozen and Alexandra Samuel explore how to create a hybrid workplace. “There is no single right way to design a hybrid workplace. But asking the right questions can help each team shape what we call the Goldilocks plan — with not too much or too little remote work,” they write.

Fortune

Senior lecturer Robert Pozen writes for Fortune about how businesses need to implement new methods for measuring employee productivity and performance. Pozen recommends an approach he developed called “success metrics,” noting that “under this approach, the manager sets objectives for their team as part of the effort to fulfill the organization’s goals. Then the manager and team members discuss how they will know at the end of the relevant period whether they have been successful in achieving these objectives.”

Reuters

Prof. Thomas Kochan speaks with Reuters reporter Timothy Appell about how the decision to support a union campaign can often become a risk assessment for employees. When it comes to individual campaigns in a workplace, “the reality sets in - when the employer campaigns so hard that you think you’re putting your job at risk,” says Kochan.

Forbes

A recent study co-authored by Assistant Prof. Danielle Li in Sloan found evidence to support the “Peter Principle,” which theorizes that the best employees do not always make the best managers, reports Rodd Wagner, a contributor for Forbes. The researchers concluded that “promoting based on lower-level job skills rather than managerial skills can be extremely costly.”

CNBC

Peter Hirst, Assoc. Dean of Executive Education at Sloan, tells Ruth Umoh of CNBC that the best perk you can offer employees is the ability to work from home. “Redesigning how his team works has created motivated and fulfilled employees ‘who are passionate about what they're doing,’” explained Umoh.

The Wall Street Journal

In an article for The Wall Street Journal about creating complementary work teams, Stu Woo highlights how Prof. Alex “Sandy” Pentland’s research group is trying to improve workplace relations by gathering data on how people interact. “Simply seeing the data encourages employees to adapt their behavior, such as trying to boost engagement among the more silent members,” Woo explains. 

Fortune- CNN

Prof. Thomas Kochan writes for Fortune that the new U.S. Secretary of Labor should support policies that unite the workforce and address issues brought forth during the presidential election. A strategy of investing in and empowering employees, “will generate both good long-term profits and support good wages and careers,” Kochan writes.