Skip to content ↓

Topic

Art

Download RSS feed: News Articles / In the Media

Displaying 1 - 15 of 70 news clips related to this topic.
Show:

The Guardian

Guardian reporter Oliver Basciano explores the work of the late artist Aldo Tambellini, who was a fellow at MIT’s Center for Advanced Visual Studies in the 1970s. “With his students he experimented with alternative documentary, collaborative film-making and live broadcast,” writes Basciano.

Boston Globe

Multimedia artist, filmmaker and poet Aldo Tambellini, a former fellow at the MIT Center for Advanced Visual Studies, died on Nov. 12, reports Bryan Marquard for The Boston Globe. “With multimedia you create an effect that is not based on previous experience,” said Tambellini in an interview in 1967. “You saturate the audience with images. It happens now; it has a live quality. It’s a total experience in itself.”

New York Times

New York Times reporter J. Hoberman chronicles the life and work of Aldo Tambellini, “a sculptor turned avant-garde filmmaker, pioneer video artist and veteran practitioner of multimedia installations,” who was a fellow at the MIT Center for Advanced Visual Studies from 1976-1984.

Forbes

Forbes reporter Eva Amsen writes about a new study by researchers from the Media Lab that explores how to credit art developed by AI systems. The researches found that “credit for AI-generated art all depends on how we think and talk about the role of AI.”

WBUR

Reporting for WBUR, Pamela Reynolds spotlights some of the MIT List Visual Arts Center’s virtual offerings. Reynolds notes that through one of their series, the List will be addressing “all the time we’ve got on our hands, with a series of online Zoom talks focused on experiences of waiting.”

The Boston Globe

Boston Globe reporter Don Aucoin spotlights the virtual MTA Playwrights Lab, an annual festival led by senior lecturer Ken Urban that features “staged readings resulting from collaborations between MIT students and professional theater artists.”

Boston Magazine

Boston Magazine reporter Alyssa Vaughn spotlights Prof. Azra Aksamija’s design proposal for a piece of public art in Cambridge that would honor the passage of the 19th Amendment. Aksamija’s project “takes the form of a three dimensional palimpsest,” writes Vaughn, “that is visible through an arrangement of concrete elements. These elements are inscribed with names and quotes from notable activists.”

Forbes

Forbes contributor Alex Ledsom highlights a study by MIT researchers examining how a spike in attendance at the Louvre has impacted visitor behavior. “People stay for shorter periods of time visiting artwork if there are more people,” Ledsom explains, “but interestingly, people move about the Louvre in the same way regardless of whether they stay for one hour or six. They simply move around the space quicker.”

Boston Globe

Boston Globe reporter Cate McQuaid spotlights the Ericka Beckman exhibit at the List Visual Arts Center. “Beckman models her incantatory, hallucinogenic films on the ritualistic repetitions of games and hard labor,” writes McQuaid. She draws on fairy tales and uses percussive, throbbing music. Woven together, these structures offer a desperate, frenzied model of life in a society driven by work, production, and the almighty dollar.”

Financial Times

Greek artist Takis, who worked on electromagnetism at MIT as a visiting researcher in the 1960s, is the subject of a forthcoming exhibition at London’s Tate Modern museum. Early in his career, the now 93-year-old Takis, “became interested in electromagnetism, and in the challenge of making art about invisible forces,” writes Peter Aspden for the Financial Times.

WBUR

WBUR reporter Pamela Reynolds highlights graduate student Joy Buolamwini’s piece, “The Coded Gaze,” which is currently on display as part of the “Avatars//Futures” exhibit at the Nave Gallery. Reynolds writes that Buolamwini’s piece “questions the inherent bias of coding in artificial intelligence, which has resulted in facial recognition technology unable to recognize black faces.”

WBUR

WBUR reporter Pamela Reynolds spotlights the Rose Salane exhibit at the List Visual Arts Center, which examines the lost collection at the World Trade Center’s Port Authority Library. “In a suggestive display, Salane unravels a tapestry of seemingly disconnected events to trace the unfolding of history,” writes Reynolds.

The Boston Globe

Boston Globe reporter Mark Feeney spotlights the “Arresting Fragments: Object Photography at the Bauhaus,” exhibit on display at the MIT Museum. The exhibit “conveys a particular sense of why the Bauhaus was so influential,” writes Fenney. 

NBC News

NBC News reporter Jacob Ward highlights how researchers from MIT, the Metropolitan Museum of Art and Microsoft are developing a system that can help predict which pieces of art could most appeal to people based on their social media profiles and preferences.

New York Times

Ted Loos at The New York Times speaks with artist and MIT alumnus Tshan Hsu, whose work is about to be featured in three shows in Hong Kong. “These are my first-ever shows in Asia,” said Tsu, who was born in Boston to Chinese parents, “and it represents a kind of return, which is really interesting.”