• Susan Rosevear (center), education officer for MIT Materials Research Laboratory’s Materials Research Science and Engineering Center, instructs students from the Putnam Avenue Upper School in Cambridge, Massachusetts, how to build a simple direct current (DC) motor.

    Susan Rosevear (center), education officer for MIT Materials Research Laboratory’s Materials Research Science and Engineering Center, instructs students from the Putnam Avenue Upper School in Cambridge, Massachusetts, how to build a simple direct current (DC) motor.

    Photo: Denis Paiste/Materials Research Laboratory

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  • Students from the Putnam Avenue Upper School in Cambridge, Massachusetts, burnish and wind copper wire to build a simple direct current (DC) motor. The Materials Research Laboratory’s Materials Research Science and Engineering Center hosted a science and engineering program at MIT for middle school students for the 28th consecutive summer.

    Students from the Putnam Avenue Upper School in Cambridge, Massachusetts, burnish and wind copper wire to build a simple direct current (DC) motor. The Materials Research Laboratory’s Materials Research Science and Engineering Center hosted a science and engineering program at MIT for middle school students for the 28th consecutive summer.

    Photo: Denis Paiste/Materials Research Laboratory

    Full Screen
  • Simple direct current (DC) motors are silhouetted on a windowsill in MIT’s Building 13, the Bush Building, which is home to the Materials Research Laboratory’s Materials Research Science and Engineering Center.

    Simple direct current (DC) motors are silhouetted on a windowsill in MIT’s Building 13, the Bush Building, which is home to the Materials Research Laboratory’s Materials Research Science and Engineering Center.

    Photo: Denis Paiste/Materials Research Laboratory

    Full Screen

Cambridge middle school students explore materials science at MIT

Susan Rosevear (center), education officer for MIT Materials Research Laboratory’s Materials Research Science and Engineering Center, instructs students from the Putnam Avenue Upper School in Cambridge, Massachusetts, how to build a simple direct current (DC) motor.

Materials Research Science and Engineering Center welcomed area students for lessons in glassblowing, making motors, and making ice cream.


Press Contact

Denis Paiste
Email: dpaiste@mit.edu
Phone: 603-479-5600
Materials Research Laboratory

Students from Cambridge’s Putnam Avenue Upper School got a taste of materials science, from glassblowing and making simple motors to making liquid nitrogen ice cream, at MIT this summer.

The Materials Research Laboratory’s Materials Research Science and Engineering Center (MRSEC) hosted 15 students and their science teacher, Fatima Sammy, for a week of hands-on science and engineering projects.

The curriculum also included metal casting, building solar cells, designing objects with fused glass, exploring ultraviolet light, polymer demonstrations, and constructing electric circuits, as well as participating in the “Fish Game,” a mobile-device-enabled game designed to build students’ understanding of complex systems.

Classes are taught by MIT staff, technical instructors, graduate students, and undergraduates. Students were on campus from 8:30 a.m. to 2:45 p.m. each day.

Basic objectives of the program are to demonstrate to young adolescents that science and engineering is fun, introduce them to the field of materials science, and have them experience science and engineering on a college campus.

The 2019 middle school program was the 28th summer the MIT MRSEC has offered a science and engineering program for students from a Cambridge, Massachusetts, middle school. Over the course of those years, the MRSEC has worked with a variety of Cambridge middle schools and reached approximately 400 students.


Topics: Materials Research Laboratory, STEM education, Community, Cambridge, Boston and region, Materials Science and Engineering, K-12 education, Classes and programs

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