• J. Kim Vandiver, dean for undergraduate research and the parent of three MIT alumni, chatted with the mother of a prospective student at a reception held for parents during Campus Preview Weekend.

    J. Kim Vandiver, dean for undergraduate research and the parent of three MIT alumni, chatted with the mother of a prospective student at a reception held for parents during Campus Preview Weekend.

    Photo / Nancy DuVergne Smith

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Preview weekend offers parents inside look at MIT

J. Kim Vandiver, dean for undergraduate research and the parent of three MIT alumni, chatted with the mother of a prospective student at a reception held for parents during Campus Preview Weekend.


Parents of prospective students got to ask their questions -- "How will my son decide where to live?" "What courses should my daughter take?" -- during the parents' reception hosted Friday, April 7, by the Alumni Association, Admission Office educational counselors and the MIT Club of Boston.

The event, part of Campus Preview Weekend (CPW), drew more than 400 parents to Walker Memorial to talk to 75 alumni, educational counselors and "parent connectors," volunteers from the MIT Parent Association who serve as resources about MIT for other parents.

Bonny Kellermann (S.B. 1972), an educational counselor and member of the MIT Club of Boston, said families are often weighing offers from several universities. They have small questions, such as where do students shop, and large questions.

"'Is MIT really worth the money?' is one question parents ask," Kellermann said. "I tell them it's a small investment for a large future."

During CPW, more than 850 accepted students plus their parents explored MIT to gather final impressions before the Monday, May 1, deadline to accept the Institute's offer of admission. Students were able to attend classes, stay overnight in a dorm and check out activities.

Dmitrii and Svetlana Kachintseva from New Jersey were investigating what options their daughter, Dina, would have if she changed her mind about studying computer science during her undergraduate years.

Dina herself was off developing her social network. She came to MIT on Thursday and had only touched base with her parents by cell phone since their arrival Friday. She was heading to Boston for dinner with seven other prefrosh that night.

"She's determined to come to MIT," said her father. "And we're very impressed with the personal contact that professors have with undergraduates here. Not every university offers that."

Tovah Feldshuh of New York said, "MIT is a thrilling place, not only because of the extraordinary dedication to cutting-edge knowledge, but also because MIT wants to be of service to the planet."

Feldshuh said she thought her daughter, Amanda Claire Levy, would find support to create her own niche at the Institute. "MIT is a good listener," she said.


Topics: Alumni/ae, Students

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