Digitalk: Where IT's At


OpenAFS client for Linux

In response to requests by Linux users on campus, Information Services and Technology (IS&T) has released an MIT-tailored installer for the OpenAFS client for standalone Red Hat Linux 9. This OpenAFS client gives authenticated, secure access to the Institute's AFS file service infrastructure as well as access to the worldwide AFS file service infrastructure.

For details about the product and how to obtain it, see http://itinfo.mit.edu/product?name=openafs&platform=Linux. If you have a question about OpenAFS, contact the Computing Help Desk at computing-help@mit.edu or 253-1101.

Math notation on the web

MathML (Mathematical Markup Language) is an XML-based standard from the World Wide Web Consortium for describing mathematical notation and capturing both its structure and content. It provides a much-needed foundation for representing mathematical expressions on web pages. For equations, MathML offers several advantages over traditional file formats, such as GIF or JPEG images or PDF, including fast loading, interactivity, accessibility, and archiving and searching capabilities.

To support MathML, IS&T has assembled a web site at http://web.mit.edu/is/topics/webpublishing/mathml with details on browser support, font installers and tools for building web pages with MathML. If you have questions or want more information about MathML, contact the Academic Computing Support Team at f_l@mit.edu or 253-0115.

Web reporting service

MIT web publishers whose content is served from web.mit.edu, www.mit.edu and other web servers at MIT can keep track of accesses to their pages. Data such as browser type and version, operating system, and whether the view came from on or off campus can be tracked on a per-page basis. Each page to be tracked must have a line of HTML code added to it. The access data is stored in the Data Warehouse, where web publishers can view it or generate reports. For more information, see http://web.mit.edu/is/services/webpublishing/webreporting.html.

A version of this article appeared in MIT Tech Talk on February 11, 2004.


Topics: Campus services

Back to the top