• Stefan Milenkovich, the 24-year-old virtuoso from Serbia, will perform at MIT.

    Stefan Milenkovich, the 24-year-old virtuoso from Serbia, will perform at MIT.

    Full Screen

MIT hosts young Serbian violinist's Boston premiere

Stefan Milenkovich, the 24-year-old virtuoso from Serbia, will perform at MIT.


At 24, Stefan Milenkovich has already won top prizes in numerous prestigious violin competitions in the United States and abroad. He gave his one-thousandth concert and performed for Ronald Reagan, Mikhail Gorbachev and Pope John Paul II all before he turned 18.

"If extraordinary technique is the measure of a true virtuoso, then without doubt violinist Stefan Milenkovich has achieved virtuoso status," wrote one critic.

On Sunday, April 29, the distinguished Serbian violinist will perform at 8pm in Kresge Auditorium in an event organized by the MIT Organization of Serbian Students (MOST).

Milica Radisic, a graduate student in chemical engineering and president of MOST, called Mr. Milenko-vich "the most famous Serbian violinist and one of the finest young artists worldwide.

"We thought it would be a great honor for MIT to host his Boston-area premiere and for our club to organize such an event," said Ms. Radisic.

Mr. Milenkovich believes that "making music is one of the most sublime ways of communicating -- much more beautiful and clear than words." He's happy to play at MIT because it "is a wonderful occasion, not only to glorify music, but also to emphasize the importance of the solidarity and care between human beings."

All proceeds of the recital will go to a charitable organization in Serbia. "We are aware of the hardship people in Serbia go through on daily basis," said Ms. Radisic. "Since [Mr. Milenkovich] generously gave up most of his fee to help this cause, the final call on what particular charity the money should go to will be decided with him."

Mr. Milenkovich -- who plays a Stradivarius violin on extended loan from the Stradivari Society -- will perform works by Bach, Beethoven, Bloch, Paganini and Dvorak. Admission is $10, $5 for students and seniors and free for children under 12.

For more information, send e-mail or see MOST's web site.

A version of this article appeared in MIT Tech Talk on April 25, 2001.


Topics: Arts

Back to the top