• Chain by John McBean, a senior in mechanical engineering, won the $600 first prize in the Edgerton-Mili Photography Contest.

    Chain by John McBean, a senior in mechanical engineering, won the $600 first prize in the Edgerton-Mili Photography Contest.

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Photography competition announces winners

Chain by John McBean, a senior in mechanical engineering, won the $600 first prize in the Edgerton-Mili Photography Contest.


The MIT Museum and the Edgerton Center have announced the winners for the sixth annual Edgerton-Mili Photography Contest, run in association with The Tech and Technique.

The contest commemorates two great MIT photographers: Harold 'Doc' Edgerton and Gjon Mili. Professor Edgerton is well known for his developments in stroboscopy. Gjon Mili, Edgerton's 1927 MIT classmate, is the famous Life magazine photographer who brought Edgerton's work to the world's attention in the 1930s.

The mission of the Edgerton-Mili Photography Contest is to bring the work of MIT student photographers to the public eye and to promote photography on campus. Funding is provided by income from a fund bequeathed to Doc Edgerton and MIT by Gjon Mili and the National Geographic Society's Centennial Award prize, presented to Edgerton in 1988.

The panel of judges for the 2000 contest were G������bor Cs������nyi, a graduate student in physics and founder of The Tech Gallery; Peter Dourmashkin, associate director of the Experimental Study Group; Jane Farver, director of the List Visual Arts Center; and Jane Pickering, director of the MIT Museum.

Chain by mechanical engineering senior John McBean was chosen for the $600 first prize. "Chain had a wonderful sense of mystery and tension, which, combined with the excellent use of scale and grey tones, made it a natural winner," said Ms. Pickering on behalf of the judges.

The $300 second-prize winner, Sunrise over Water, was produced by electrical engineering and computer science senior Alea Teeters and others as part of a class at the Edgerton Center itself. Jim Bales, assistant director of the Edgerton Center, said that as soon as he saw it, he encouraged the students to submit the picture to the competition.

Third prize ($100) was awarded to economics freshman Jacqueline To Yen for Walls.

The winning entries will be featured in the biannual photography publication, The Tech Gallery.

A version of this article appeared in MIT Tech Talk on May 23, 2001.


Topics: Arts

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