Arts News


The Martin Luther King Jr. Planning Committee seeks MIT students to share their talents in theater, music, poetry, dance and art at MIT's MLK Celebration on Thursday, Feb. 3. The festivities include a breakfast followed by performances and entertainment in Lobby 10 from 12-1:30pm and 4:30-5:30pm. Contact Tobie Weiner, x3-3649, iguanatw@mit.edu, or Trudy Morris, x3-4954, rainbow@mit.edu with interests, recommendations and suggestions.

MIT affiliate Camila Chaves Cortes will display images of the Central Artery construction project along with her international photographs on December 18-19 from 12-9pm at 62 Western Ave. in Cambridge. To see her work at other times, call 497-2638 or e-mail camila@mit.edu. Ms. Chaves Cortes, who has made an annual trip to Berlin, Germany for the past six years will publish her photographic documentation of the largest urban transformation in Europe in her upcoming book, Unity: Building the New Berlin, available in 2000.

Attendance figures at the List Visual Arts Center are up so far this year, in part because the first exhibitions feature two artists (Gregory Gillespie and Maria Magdalena Campos-Pons) with roots in Massachusetts, says List Center Administrative Officer David Freilach. Mary Sherman of the Boston Herald praised Mr. Gillepsie's paintings as "riveting," citing the "masterful tension between real and surreal, abstraction and narrative, three-dimensionality and the illusion of it." ArtsMedia (Boston's monthly guide to the visual arts) applauded Ms. Campos-Pons's ability to "allow us to enter her personal space... Even without knowing the artist's biographical history, we can approach the installation on a visual level that will stimulate individual memories specific to each viewer, every life."

Two MIT composers have made Boston Globe columnist Richard Dyer's listing of defining moments in classical music for the Globe's end-of-the-century retrospective series on the arts. Media Laboratory Associate Professor Tod Machover's opera Valis was included as a defining moment of the years 1981-89 and Institute Professor John Harbison's opera, The Great Gatsby (which premieres this month at New York's Metropolitan Opera) was recognized for 1991-99.

A version of this article appeared in MIT Tech Talk on December 15, 1999.


Topics: Arts

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