Shaw appointed to OME post


Ann Davis Shaw, who has been associate director of career services at MIT since 1986, has been named assistant dean/assistant director of the Office For Minority Education, effective July 14.

The appointment was announced by Associate Dean Leo Osgood Jr., director of the Office of Minority Education.

"She brings to the position over 25 years of administrative, organizational, leadership and strategic thinking skills," said Dean Osgood. "She has been a catalyst in assisting professional organizations establish the annual Career Fair. Her commitment to the total development of under-represented minority students will be an asset to the department as we move towards the 21st century. I am truly delighted with this appointment."

"This is a great career opportunity," Ms. Shaw said. "I look forward to closer interactions with students, faculty and the administration. It's great to be part of the team to fulfill the academic mission of the Office of Minority Education."

As a freshman advisor, Ms. Shaw co-taught a 15-week seminar last year on Leadership Development: Managing Diversity for the 21st Century. A graduate of Simmons College, Ms. Shaw has been a member of MIT's Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Presidential Celebration Committee since 1993. She is also the industrial liaison to the MIT Chapter of the National Society of Black Engineers and the advisor to the MIT Chapter of the Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers.

While in the field of career services, she served on the executive board of the regional professional organization, the Eastern College and Employee Network. Ms. Shaw completed the 15-week Greater Boston Executive Program in Business Management at the Sloan School in 1993. She received the BA in sociology from Simmons College in 1970 and the MEd in administration and supervision on the higher education level from Suffolk University in 1979. She also completed the Social Work Training Program at Simmons in 1972.

A version of this article appeared in MIT Tech Talk on August 13, 1997.


Topics: Administration

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