Web-based SAP tool readied


The Management Reporting Project has announced that a Web-based tool (SAPweb) will be available in early June to access SAP purchase order information. The tool was developed in response to the community's desire for lookup capabilities available in the previous version of the EREQ system.

Information will be obtained from the Web site at http://web.mit.edu/sapweb> by entering an SAP purchase order number, or a paper or EREQ requisition number. The line items of the purchase order will appear, along with processed invoices and checks that have been issued or will be issued against the invoices.

To ensure that this tool can be used only by members of the MIT community, SAPweb uses security features available with Netscape Navigator 3.0 and higher. (This software may be downloaded from http://net-dist.mit.edu>.)

To access the SAPweb tool the first time, the Web browser must be issued a "secure web certificate" from the MIT Certificate Server (see http://web.mit.edu/is/help/cert>). To obtain the certificate, a user must have an MIT ID number and an MIT Kerberos name and password. The ID number can be found on the MIT ID card. Cards are issued at the Card Office (x3-3475, Rm E32-121). The Kerberos name and password is the same as the Athena/Eudora user name (username@mit.edu) and password. New accounts can be set up by calling Athena User Accounts at x3-1325.

The SAPweb tool is being developed in two phases. The first phase will provide query functions described above. The second phase, scheduled for early 1998, will add the ability to create and display requisitions, create purchase orders and list purchase orders by account number.

The SAPweb tool is a joint project undertaken by the Management Reporting Project and Information Systems. The leader of the SAPweb Development and Implementation Team is Rocklyn Clarke, senior systems programmer with I/S.

Inquiries or comments about the SAPweb tool may be addressed to Robert Murray at x8-7318 or sent by e-mail to sapweb@mit.edu>.

A version of this article appeared in MIT Tech Talk on June 4, 1997.


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