Web sightings


The Web site for the Technology and Policy Program includes a description of TPP for prospective students, including criteria for admission, descriptions of degree programs, information about student activities, alumni/ae news and evaluations for every course taught within the program, including a mechanism to allow students (MIT only) to submit evaluations as well as read them. Links to other MIT programs, centers and schools in which TPP students can conduct research are also provided.
http://web.mit.edu/tpp/www/>

The text of the plays and poetry by the Bard of Avon can be found at Shakespeare Online. At this site, users can search Shakespeare's works (which are grouped chronologically, alphabetically or by genre) for familiar words or phrases. Another page has links to Shakespeare resources on the Internet, including film databases, festivals and other Renaissance information. There's also an area for readers to post comments and discuss the works.
http://the-tech.mit.edu/Shakespeare/works.html>

Fans and future entrants in the popular 6.270 Robot Design Competition can get information about the rules, equipment kits and history of the course and competition on the Web. The site has a link to an archive of 6.270 files, and MPEG movies of the 1995 contest table are planned.
http://web.mit.edu:8001/courses/6.270/home.html>

The International Motor Vehicle Program, in which researchers study the world automobile industry and its effects on society, has a site with an online library of IMVP research papers, newsletter summaries (plus online ordering for these publications), and links to affiliated foundations, governments, companies and research institutions. An audio welcome message is available in nine languages, and there is a page of links to many other organizations and programs related to automobile research.
http://web.mit.edu/ctpid/www/imvp/>

(Anyone with an MIT-related Web page to suggest for Web Sightings can contact Tech Talk Assistant Editor Alice Waugh at awaugh@mit.edu> or x8-5401)

A version of this article appeared in MIT Tech Talk on March 20, 1996.


Topics: Campus services

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