MIT will provide $10 subsidy for MBTA passes


MIT will provide a $10-a-month subsidy for MBTA monthly passes to eligible MIT employees and students beginning in September.

Senior Vice President William R. Dickson said Monday that he had accepted the MIT Transportation and Parking Committee recommendations, which were designed to "encourage broader use of the MBTA by our community."

The committee, headed by Professor Alexander Klibanov of chemistry, said it believes that the proposal "will provide the fairest program for the largest number of individuals."

The committee recommended that sales at MIT of the subsidized T passes be limited to registered commuting students who have a valid MIT ID card and to MIT-paid employees who don't have a monthly parking pass. MIT employees who occasionally buy daily parking passes (limited to eight per month), but don't have a monthly parking pass, may buy the subsidized T passes.

The committee noted that employees must receive their salary or wages through MIT to be eligible for the plan. Individuals who are unpaid, or who work as consultants, for a third party,or for affiliated organizations, are not eligible.

The committee estimated that about two-thirds of the approximately 7,400 persons eligible would take advantage of the subsidy. The passes will be distributed by the Parking and Transportation Office, which will move to Building E32 on Carleton Street in the fall.

Those eligible include 6,700 paid employees (1,300 employees are without stipend). Of the 6,700, about 4,000 will choose to have monthly parking permits, leaving 2,700 employees eligible for the subsidized pass.

About 1,335 undergraduates who live off campus and don't have parking permits will be eligible, as will about 3,350 graduate students who live off campus and don't have parking permits.

Professor Klibanov, in a letter to Mr. Dickson last month, noted, "As the Institute's parking inventory continues to evolve and spaces in open lots must be rebuilt in garages, keeping demand for parking stable-or reducing it-will save MIT considerable amounts of capital construction dollars."

Further details will be made available in the next issue of Tech Talk on Aug. 28.

A version of this article appeared in MIT Tech Talk on July 24, 1996.


Topics: Campus services

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